We Are Randox | Career opportunities in India and beyond

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We Are Randox | Career opportunities in India and beyond

With a presence in as many as 145 different countries around the world, a lot of our Randox team work outside the UK. This week we headed in the direction of Asia and met up with Pankaj Chitkara, who is our National Sales Manager for the RX Series in India.

Hi Pankaj, can you tell me about your relocation?

When I first started with Randox I was based in Mumbai and then I relocated to New Delhi.  I have been with Randox for nearly ten years now and I am employed as the national sales manager for the RX Series – I love my job.

How did you find the relocation process?

I never really imagined relocating when I first started off in Randox but now I love living in New Delhi. I think because I am doing the exact same role as I did when I was based in Mumbai I am quite lucky because relocating didn’t involve starting off from scratch. I was saved from having to learn a whole new role as well as getting used to a whole new city, which I know can be a bit daunting. Of course, as with any move there are always a few hurdles you have to get passed before you’re fully settled in. House hunting usually takes a bit of time before you find something that’s right and then you have the hassles of packing and unpacking and getting your family all settled into their new home and routine. But overall relocating was never a big issue for me. I think if I was given the opportunity to relocate again I would definitely consider it. As long as there are opportunities to grow, learn and improve it can be a very positive experience.

Do you travel back to Mumbai often?

New Delhi is my home now so I don’t need to travel back to Mumbai. It’s roughly about two hours on the plane so if I needed to go back it wouldn’t be a problem. My parents currently live here so it was good to already have family near. They were able to help me get settled in and find somewhere to live.

How are you finding living in New Delhi?

There is loads to do and see here, and I am really enjoying the lifestyle that it offers. The weather is always on your side and I love the culture of the city.  The India Gate which is 42m high is like an archway in the middle of a crossroad. It was built to commemorate 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives during World War 1. At night it is beautifully lit up while the fountains nearby make a lovely display with coloured lights.

What has been the highlight of your relocation so far?

The highlight of my relocation definitely has been managing the business without an office. It’s fantastic!

If you would be interested in joining our team you can visit Randox careers to see what current opportunities we have available for you. #WeAreRandox


Inflammatory Biomarker Series: Rheumatoid Factor

What are inflammatory biomarkers?

The purpose of measuring an inflammatory biomarker is to detect inflammation, which can assist clinicians in the identification of a particular disease or provide a marker of treatment response. Inflammation, either chronic or acute, is the body’s immune response to protect against harmful stimuli such as damaged cells, irritants or pathogens.1 When inflammation occurs in the body, extra protein is released from the site of inflammation and circulates in the bloodstream.2 It is these proteins, or antibodies, which clinicians are testing for in the blood as they can indicate if inflammation is present.

Like many inflammatory biomarkers, such as rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP) or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), further tests will be required as testing for these tests alone does not provide a clearly defined diagnosis. However inflammatory biomarker tests can provide clinicians with a good indication of what may be wrong with a patient, which is why they are commonly tested for in a clinical setting.


What is Rheumatoid Factor?


Rheumatoid factor (RF) is an autoantibody which can target and damage healthy body tissue and in turn cause inflammatory symptoms.3 It is uncommon for this antibody to be present in healthy individuals, which is why it is a beneficial test to aid the diagnostic process. In particular, rheumatoid factor can be used as an inflammatory biomarker to assist in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However the rheumatoid factor antibody can also be present in healthy individuals or patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, liver cirrhosis, Sjögren’s Syndrome, Hepatitis and other conditions.4 If a test detects rheumatoid factor levels above 14 IU/ml, this is considered abnormally high.3

What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease which attacks the lining tissue of joints, resulting in chronic inflammation. This disease commonly affects the hands, feet and wrists, with symptoms causing pain, fatigue and loss of bodily function and over time may even lead to multiple organ damage.5 Although diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis requires a physical examination, testing for rheumatoid factor can be beneficial to assist in the diagnosis of this disease. Other blood tests that can be used to detect biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis include C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), IgA, IgG, IgM and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP).

For health professionals

Randox Laboratories offer a leading portfolio of diagnostic reagents which includes a test for rheumatoid factor, with applications available for a range of biochemistry analysers. With a measuring range of 6.72 – 104 lU/ml, this assay can comfortably detect levels outside the normal range. Randox offer a complete diagnostic package for the screening of rheumatoid factor with a range of kit sizes, controls and calibrators available. Other inflammatory biomarker tests available from Randox include CRP, High Sensitivity CRP, Full Range CRP, IgA, IgG and IgM.

References:

1. Nordqvist, C. Inflammation: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment. Medical News Today, https://goo.gl/rT4WS9 (accessed 16 January 2017)
2. Harding, M., Blood Tests to Detect Inflammation, Patient, 2015, https://goo.gl/F4OGrz, (accessed 16 January 2017)
3. Shiel, W. C., Rheumatoid Factor (RF), MedicineNet, 2016, https://goo.gl/XPA69u 2016 (accessed 16 January 2017)
4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Organisation, Rheumatoid Factor Test, Rheumatoid Arthritis Organisation, 2016, https://goo.gl/JujE5a
5. Gibofsky, A. Overview of Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis. The American Journal of Managed Care. Vol.18, No.13. p.295-302, 2012

Inflammatory Biomarker: Rheumatoid Factor


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