Coagulation Reagents

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Coagulation, a complex process by which blood forms clots, is an important process required to stop bleeding and begin repair of a damaged vessel. Coagulation is measured when a patient’s blood is not clotting properly, when blood is clotting too easily, if clots remain in the body too long, to monitor patients on anticoagulation therapy and aspirin therapy, and, to evaluate a patient’s risk of excessive bleeding before surgery.

Randox manufacture a range of high performance coagulation reagents offering provision for full coagulation analysis. To discover more about our range of coagulation assays select an option from the drop-down menu. Alternatively, to learn more about coagulation and the relevance of Randox coagulation assays please read the sections below.

Coagulation products available from Randox

Coagulation is an important process, enabling our bodies to control blood flow when we cut ourselves…

Coagulation takes place when a blood vessel is injured, and is the name given to the process by which blood clotting occurs. Coagulation involves circulating substances within our blood to work together and form a clot. These substances include platelets (a type of blood cell) and proteins in our plasma (liquid part of blood). They form a clot by changing our blood from a liquid state into a gel. Blood clotting is extremely important for our body’s survival and is what prevents excessive bleeding when we cut ourselves.

However, abnormal coagulation can cause severe health issues…

Abnormal coagulation can lead to blood clots forming inside a blood vessel causing the flow of blood through the circulatory system to become obstructed. This is referred to as thrombosis and is a danger to our health due to the restriction of blood to the heart, brain and other vital organs. Blood clots can form inside a blood vessel if the wall of the blood vessel has been damaged and narrowed as a result. Blood vessels can be damaged by broken bones, severe muscle damage, as a result of surgery and as a result of conditions such as vasculitis (inflammation of the vein wall).

Haemophilia, another coagulation abnormality, refers to the inability to clot normally. Those with Haemophilia are at risk of excessive bleeding in the event of a cut. It is an inherited condition which affects the amount of clotting factors found in blood. In severe cases internal bleeding can occur, usually around the joints and muscles which can lead to joint damage over time.

Ask your doctor to check your blood coagulation!

If you are worried about your risk of developing a blood clot, or think you may have an issue clotting speak to your doctor. Various tests you may want to ask for include:

  • Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) to measure all coagulation reactions that occur inside the body (except for platelet aggregation)
  • Antithrombin III (ATIII) to ensure balanced coagulation in the body– ATIII inhibits thrombin activity and helps to control blood clotting
  • Fibrinogen to identify fibrinogen levels in the blood – Fibrinogen is a protein made by the liver. Abnormal levels of fibrinogen may be a sign of excessive bleeding
  • Thrombin Time (TT) to measure how well fibrinogen is working – TT is a measure of the rate of conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin (the ‘molecular glue’ required to form a solid clot during the coagulation process) and is used to estimate haemostatically active fibrinogen
  • Prothrombin Time to measure how well and how long it takes for the blood to clot

Similarly your doctor may order these tests if he/she suspects you have a clotting disorder such as haemophilia (inability to clot normally) or thrombophilia (excessive clotting).

Hemostasis abnormalities can cause severe risk to patients…

Hemostasis, the process which causes bleeding to subside, is an extremely important process in the body as it keeps blood within a damaged blood vessel and prevents excessive bleeding. Three major steps within the process of Hemostasis include:

  • Vasoconstriction, the constriction or narrowing of a blood vessel; this vascular activity slows the blood flow to an area
  • Platelet plug formation to temporarily block and seal the injured area. This occurs almost instantly after the blood vessel has been damaged
  • Coagulation to reinforce the platelet plug and form a solid clot. Blood changes from a liquid state to a gel via a series of chemical reactions. Fibrin threads act as a ‘molecular glue’ during this process to stop the blood flow and allow tissue repair to begin

Some individuals experience hemostatic abnormalities which can lead to clotting disorders such as haemophilia (inability to clot normally) or thrombophilia (excessive clotting). Such disorders can lead to excessive bleeding or thrombosis resulting in an obstruction of blood flow through the circulatory system.

Some patients may be considered at risk of clotting disorders such as those with a family history of blood-clotting disorders; those with low mobility (as a result of blood circulation being slowed); patients with cancer (some forms can increase the amount of substances in the blood); and pregnant women (the body prevents excessive blood loss during childbirth by increasing the ease of clotting, however this increases the chance of thrombosis).

A few simple tests can identify patient coagulation abnormalities…

Testing a patient’s coagulation can help assess their risk of excessive bleeding or developing thrombosis. Coagulation can be measured with a few simple tests and should be carried out if you suspect a patient’s blood is not clotting properly or is clotting too easily; to evaluate a patient’s risk of excessive bleeding before surgery; to monitor patients on medication which may affect their clotting ability; and to monitor patients on anticoagulation therapy or aspirin therapy.

Coagulation tests include:

  • Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) to measure all coagulation reactions that occur inside the body (except for platelet aggregation)
  • Antithrombin III (ATIII) to ensure balanced coagulation in the body– ATIII inhibits thrombin activity and helps to control blood clotting
  • Fibrinogen to identify fibrinogen levels in the blood – Fibrinogen is synthesised in the liver. Abnormal levels of fibrinogen may be a sign of excessive bleeding
  • Thrombin Time (TT) to measure how well fibrinogen is working – TT is a measure of the rate of conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin and is used to estimate haemostatically active fibrinogen. Abnormal results may be due to inherited fibrinogen disorders, liver disease, some cancers, and medications that affect clotting
  • Prothrombin Time to measure how well and how long it takes for the blood to clot. The normal rate is 25-30 seconds. Abnormal results may be a result of a patient on medication that thins the blood, or a result of hemophilia, liver disease and malabsorption. The Prothrombin Time test is useful for monitoring patients who take medication that can affect clotting i.e. warfarin

Please contact us for further information, or to receive informative materials for your laboratory. Alternatively, download our coagulation brochure.

Randox range of high performance coagulation assays includes Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT), Antithrombin III (ATIII), Fibrinogen, Thrombin Time (TT) and Prothrombin Time.

Benefits of our coagulation assays include:

  • Wide measuring ranges for accurate detection of abnormal results
  • Strong correlation against standard method ensures results you can trust
  • Dedicated controls and calibrators for enhanced accuracy
  • Excellent precision
  • Applications for a wide range of clinical chemistry analysers
  • High reagent stability for cost-effectiveness

To order your coagulation kits visit our online store or contact reagents@randox.com to get in touch with your local sales representative. Alternatively, contact us to request a kit insert, or review our individual product pages for more information.

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