International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

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International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Why this Day is Important

The purpose of International Day of Women and Girls in Science (IDGWS) is to bring everyone forward for sustainable and fair development in society. The international day allows us to celebrate women’s achievements in science and places the necessary focus on ensuring girls are equally equipped with the skills necessary to enter a career in STEM.

This year commences the 8th year of International Day of Women and Girls in Science and aims to particularly focus on the role of women and girls in science in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As Gender equality has always been a fundamental issue for the United Nations, the empowerment of women and girls will make a vital contribution, not only to economic development, but also across all the Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In doing so the IDWGS aims to connect women and girls in science to the international community, strengthening connections to science, society and the development of strategies aimed towards the future.

*Click the individual photographs for their full interview*


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our fifth interview is with Marketing Manager, Lynsey Adams. 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I have always been interested in biology and what makes us unique.  For that reason, I chose to study Genetics at Queens University Belfast.  I have been lucky enough to work in the life sciences industry ever since.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

When I first came to Randox 15 years ago, I started off in Technical Support.  I then progressed into the Marketing department and worked my way up to where I am today, to be the Head of Marketing. My role predominantly involves Marketing our scientific product ranges as well as B2C product offerings and sponsorships. Having a background in science has helped me to excel in my Marketing role and I am fortunate to be able to have the opportunity to do both the things that I enjoy and am passionate about.

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

There has been an increase of women in STEM in general, whether that be more females studying STEM related subjects at university or exploring a career in STEM.  Throughout the years, I have been privileged to work with so many females in managerial and authoritative roles within Randox.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

Throughout the years I have been fortunate enough to have female teachers and lecturers provide crucial STEM related education who encourage females to pursue a career in STEM. During my working career I have experienced the same opportunities as other colleagues and seen an increase in women exceling in science.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

Awareness of the varied career paths available within STEM related industries would be beneficial.  The availability of work experience, placement, apprenticeship and graduate programmes like those offered at Randox helps to expose both males and females to the many exciting opportunities in the field.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

STEM is an equal playing field, so have confidence in your own ability and intelligence to get to where you want to be.

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our fourth interview is with Head of RCLS Quality, Emma McGoldrick. 

 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I have always been interested in how things work.  I enjoyed Maths and Science at school and chose to study Biomedical Science at university because it gave an overview of different areas of science and had a lot of practical modules.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

I started in Randox in 2018 working in the RTS laboratory doing routine analysis.  During the pandemic I moved across to RCLS and was involved in the Covid-19 testing as a PCR shift lead and eventually a Deputy Lab Manager.  In 2022, when the testing demands were decreasing, I moved into the RCLS Quality Department and became the Head of Department.

The Quality Department are responsible for ensuring the validity of results that are sent out to our customers, allowing them to have confidence in our service.  The Quality Department are also responsible for maintaining our accreditation status and applying for any new accreditations for new testing.

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

Over the years I have seen an increase in the number of women, not only in science, but in positions of responsibility or authority.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

I wouldn’t say I have found it more difficult as such but at times you can be very conscious of the fact that it can be a very male dominated field and as a result of that feel that you have to work harder or do more to be taken seriously.

Fortunately, in the course of my career I have had a lot of female managers and colleagues.  In fact, out of pure circumstance my team is predominantly women which is quite nice to work in a very supportive environment.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

I think it is important to showcase careers in Science and STEM to give young girls the insight into what they can achieve.  It is important to support young girls in school and allow them to feel heard and encouraged that they can do whatever they choose without any undue pressure in adhering to societal gender roles.  Outreach to primary school age girls as well as high school age girls and showing them the variety of careers available to them in STEM is an important step in encouraging more women to go into STEM.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

I would say to any women starting out in STEM to keep going and pursue their career path and not to be put off.  There is plenty of room for women in STEM and they shouldn’t be afraid to take up space in the field.

 

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our third interview is with Business Development Manager, Remy Patton. 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I was always interested in Biology and studied Biomedical Science at University in Edinburgh. During my degree I spent a lot of time in the lab, but after 4 years of studying I knew working in a lab environment full time wasn’t for me. I wanted a sales role, staying within the medical industry. After taking a gap year I applied for the Graduate Scheme at Randox. I have been given the opportunity to progress quickly in this role and now get the best of both worlds – engaging with customers, while also using my Scientific background.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

I am a Sales Manager, overseeing some of our European markets. I have been working at Randox for just over 3 years and am lucky enough to get the opportunity to travel internationally every month. While on work trips I visit current customers, build relationships with potential new customers, all while promoting our Randox Quality Control portfolio. Being in the field also allows me to see Randox products being used in real-life scenarios. Ultimately, the products we sell ensures accurate patient results, which is our number one priority.

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

Women are gradually infiltrating into this industry, due to STEM subjects being encouraged at school from a young age. We now have successful role models, inspiring future generations of female STEM workers. In Randox, we have career focused women working in many different departments, such as Manufacturing, Engineering and Logistics – which were once male dominated sectors.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

In this role, I have never felt disadvantaged to be female and have actively been encouraged to progress in the company and further my career. I’ve had the same opportunities as my male colleagues and feel that I can provide the same quality of service to the company.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

We can promote equal opportunities for both male and female candidates and make it clear that females are as successful in the science industry as males. We can also team up with local schools and universities to hold workshops, to show women exactly how many different opportunities there are to explore within science.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

My advice would be for women to believe in their abilities to succeed!

 

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our second interview is with Lead Biomedical Engineer- Sarah Hamilton.

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

At A-Level I studied Technology & Design, Biology & Chemistry. I always enjoyed the process of facing a problem scenario and working through design processes to form a solution. The problems I identified were always centred around healthcare issues. During A-Levels, I also had the opportunity to take part in the Sentinus Golden Crest Award, an initiative promoting STEM in schools. I went on to pursue a career in Engineering largely down to the great exposure I had to the industry during my time at school. Biomedical Engineering appealed to me most as it had the added aspects of applying biological/biochemical principles to technology in ways that improve healthcare provision and create products that directly impact quality of life. As part of my degree, I had an Industrial placement year, this experience was within Medical Device R&D where I had some amazing mentors who helped me see that Engineering R&D was definitely the correct career path for me.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

My role within Randox is Lead Biomedical Engineer within the Engineering R&D department. I started in 2017 having graduated from Ulster University as a Biomedical Engineer. During the last 6 years I have progressed to a Team Leader role. In this role I co-ordinate a team of 7 people from Senior to Placement Biomedical Engineers.

Within this team we work across multiple projects which are all in different stages of development. My main role is to plan and facilitate the completion of testing ranging from early prototype development through to Verification & Validation. The Biomedical Engineering role involves working within a multidisciplinary team of Mechanical, Electrical & Embedded Design Engineers, Software Developers & Testers and Scientists (Chemists & Physicists). In Engineering, we also work alongside Assay Development Scientists and Lab Scientists. In doing so we ensure our product requirements are in line with user needs and performance is as expected.

 

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

Comparing my time at school & university to now, there has been a noticeable change in the emphasis put on STEM careers. It is great to see employers from a variety of industries participating in more outreach programmes aimed at both primary, secondary and tertiary education levels, similar to the Sentinus Award which first got me interested in a STEM career. Many of my colleagues, and I, have participated in different events aimed at promoting careers in STEM. And I know many companies have diversity and inclusion programmes with aims of attracting more females into STEM roles at both junior and more senior levels. I feel that this has helped change attitudes of both woman and men from what was previously considered normal within STEM.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

When I started as a graduate engineer, I was the only female in a team of 15 men, so, while I have found the industry still quite predominately male, I don’t believe this poses any setbacks for starting out in a STEM career or for career progression. Currently, within my own team of Biomedical Engineers, we have an even split of woman to men which is a positive step in the right direction, and I look forward to seeing that equality normalised in future. Overall, getting to work within a group of likeminded people who work together to solve multiple complex problems is extremely rewarding.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

I think improving and promoting initiatives that provide exposure/insight into the STEM industry in schools is one of the best ways to inspire the next generation. It allows more girls to see the many different roles in the STEM industry which they might not otherwise have been aware of or considered pursuing.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

Have confidence to make sure you are heard.

 

 

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our first interview is with Head of technical Services- Louise Lynn.

 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I enjoyed science at school and it was an easy decision to continue science through to A-level. I went on to study Biochemistry at Queens University, Belfast and during my time there I heard about Randox.  I applied for various jobs when I graduated, but Randox interested me the most and was most applicable for my degree.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

I am currently Head of Technical Services in Randox, overseeing the Global Technical Support and Applications Teams.

I have been working in Randox for almost 25 years!  I started in the R&D lab during the development of our Liquid Enzyme reagents, and quickly moved into Technical Support.  I have held various roles within Technical Support over the years and have seen many changes in that time.  As a department we support the Randox Clinical products, dealing with enquiries, complaints and troubleshooting, as well as customer training.  No two days are the same.

I enjoy dealing directly with the customers and building those relationships. Working in Technical Support has given me the opportunity to travel and visit labs globally which has been very interesting and allows you to see our products in use and is always a reminder that ultimately there is a patient depending on our products to manage their health.

During the pandemic I was also involved in setting up the Covid Customer Support Team which was one of the most challenging times in my career, but also a very positive experience.

 

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

During my time at university and throughout my career I have worked alongside many females, however I have seen an increase in female engineers over more recent years, which is great to see in one of the more male dominated sectors of the business.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

Throughout my career at Randox I have had both male and female managers.  We have been very fortunate that everyone is given an equal opportunity within the company and we have always had females in senior management positions.  At no stage in my career have I found being a female has caused me to struggle or consider changing my career path.  I was also given flexibility when my children were young, but this did not prevent me from progressing my career once I was ready to do so again.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

Female scientists and engineers going into schools and talking about what they do.  Many young people don’t know what they want to do and getting their attention at an early age and hearing real life career stories first hand can have a huge impact.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

Decide what you want to do and have confidence in yourself that you can do it, even if it is in a male dominated sector.  You will make mistakes, but that is science, learn from them and move on.

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


Randox sponsors Science Summer School Northern Ireland

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Monday 31st January 2022: Randox sponsors Science Summer School Northern Ireland

An official launch for Science Summer School Northern Ireland 2022 has taken place at the Ryobi headquarters in Carrickfergus.

Ryobi are the headline sponsor of the Science Summer School Northern Ireland event, which aims to inspire young people to become the next generation of scientists with an inspirational programme that mixes the best of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths) through a series of seminars, discussions and hands-on experiments.

On Friday, the Deputy Mayor of Mid and East Antrim, Lord Andrew Mawson OBE, Richard Mallett, and representatives from the other main sponsors, Terumo Blood and Cell Technologies, Randox, Almac, NRC and IPC Mouldings all gathered in Carrickfergus to officially launch the event which will take place later this year.

The Science Summer School initiative was established in 2012 at St. Paul’s Way Trust School in East London by Lord Andrew Mawson OBE and Professor Brian Cox CBE. The project is now expanding nationally with the aim to make ‘the UK the best place to do science and engineering in the world’.

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Matthew Armstrong, said:

 “Council’s Manufacturing Task Force are delighted to be working with a range of local businesses, schools, universities and partner organisations to bring this exciting opportunity to the borough.

“We are thrilled that this event is now going accessible to young people in Mid and East Antrim.

“Our hope is that they will be inspired to embark on a future in science and maybe even become leaders in that field.”

Managing Director of Ryobi, Marco Emig, said: 

 “Ryobi are delighted to be the headline sponsor of this event.

“Science and the desire to learn more about how our world works, and about how we can use that information to improve how we live our lives, has never been more attractive or relevant as a subject area and a potential career path.

“We are very much looking forward to seeing the creative ideas generated from our young people.”

Lord Mawson OBE said: 

 “The Science Summer School initiative here in Northern Ireland will activate the curiosities of the young people who take part and hopefully inspire them to great things.

“This annual celebratory event and the allied programme of STEAM related activity throughout the year provides a vital catalyst to bring together different partners from education and enterprise.  I am delighted to see so many companies have ‘signed up’ to support our first event this year.

 “There is never a better time to be bringing the Science School Northern Ireland hosted by Professor Cox to Ballymena.”

For further information please contact randoxpr@randox.com

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We Are Randox | Tech Trailblazer Margaret Le Roux

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18 March 2020

Tech Trailblazers: Margaret Le Roux

Tech Trailblazers: Margaret Le Roux

Sync NI, in celebration of Women in Tech, recently spoke with our IT Operations Team Leader Margaret.

Read on as Margaret share’s her typical day, the favourite thing about her job, and how her specialist role at Randox combines a degree in Biomedical Science with a passion for software development.

Name: Margaret Le Roux

Role: IT Operations Team Leader, Randox Laboratories

Biography:

I graduated from the University of Rhodesia (now known as Zimbabwe), as a Biomedical Scientist in 1980. My career in South Africa was then predominantly in the clinical laboratory medicine field, and I qualified as a Technical Assessor for clinical laboratories through the South African National Accreditation System. I moved to Belfast in 2014 and started work with Randox.

What does your typical day look like?

I work in an IT Operations role bridging our science and quality control software, which assesses the accuracy and reliability of blood tests, and the machines they are run on, in the likes of hospitals, laboratories, and veterinary clinics. On a typical day, I deal with customer queries about this software, troubleshoot the issues, and drive new developments to improve our systems and applications. I also spend time training Randox staff, mentoring some of my junior colleagues, and speaking at Biomedical Science Conferences to educate others in the industry about the importance of quality control software.

What are you currently working on?

I’m currently working on the specification for our external quality assessment software, which involves a mock blood sample being run in a laboratory’s analyser, and the result being sent back to Randox so that we can independently check that it is performing correctly.

I have also been working on the software project that saw Randox win ‘Project Team of the Year’ at the 2019 Belfast Telegraph IT Awards. This cloud-based quality control technology was specifically designed for ‘Point of Care’ machines which provide finger prick blood tests for conditions like heart disease and diabetes, in pharmacies, GP surgeries and A&E departments.

Did you always want to work in the tech industry?

I have been very lucky that my specialist role at Randox combines my degree in Biomedical Science, and my experience in QC, with my passion for software development. In South Africa, I worked as a Quality Officer for a large private laboratory, with 3 main laboratories and over 100 peripheral sites across 10 African countries. The management of quality control data was a huge job and as such I became interested in a software program that could assist the lab with this task.

What inspired you to join Randox in particular?

Whilst working in South Africa, I was one of Randox’s customers, and made extensive use of their quality control products. Randox has always had a very good reputation in South Africa so when I moved to Belfast it was a natural choice for me.

What’s your favourite part about your work?

It’s a great feeling when we introduce a new release to our software and you know that the customers are going to benefit from it.

What would you say to other people considering a job in the tech industry?

A job in the tech industry is simultaneously exciting and challenging, as each day brings something new. You will continually be making improvements and striving to make something better, which is a good work ethic. It’s really satisfying when you are part of a team which develops a software program that is so well accepted in the market and useful to the customer.

How do you see this technology impacting on our lives?

The technology industry is so fluid and moving at such a fast pace, and there are developments across all industries which are making our lives easier. At Randox in particular, our software is helping a range of healthcare professionals – whether laboratory technicians, clinicians or veterinarians – to achieve our shared goal of saving and improving the lives of patients. It’s rewarding to know we are making a difference.

Who inspired you to work in this field?

In the field of Quality Control, I was inspired by Dr Pandelani Rambau, a Clinical Pathologist from Johannesburg. In IT, it was a colleague Sean Dicks who showed me that there is always a way to get a program to do what you need it to do.

What do you consider to be the most important tech innovation or development in recent years?

The development of communication devices has been incredibly important. They open up the whole world to us and we can access things, both socially and for education, that previously were only available to a few. They have brought so much information to our fingertips.

What tech gadget could you not live without?

I couldn’t live without my phone, because it is so much more than just a phone. It holds all the important things that make up my life, like messages, memories, and my calendar.

To find out more about Randox IT and the vacancies we have in the team, please email recruitment@randox.com 

For more We Are Randox stories about our amazing colleagues, make sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and follow the hashtag #WeAreRandox.

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We Are Randox | Randox’s very own Secret Footballer, Corey McMullan

Follow football? Then you won’t want to miss our exclusive interview with Glentoran player Corey McMullan.

Mathematics placement student Corey recently signed a two year contract with the prestigious Belfast football team and took some time out during the off season to talk to us about his football journey to date.

Read Corey’s story below.

“I’ve always been into sports. When I was younger I played football, tennis, badminton…I had a go at everything really but football has always been my main passion. Some of my best memories are of the Milk Cup which is held up in the north coast. I was captain of the Derry/Londonderry team and we played against some of the biggest teams in the world including CSKA Moscow and the Corinthians from Brazil. The following year I represented Northern Ireland in the Under 18s Centenary Shield. I think getting to play for your nation is a great honour and what it made it even more sweet was the fact that we beat the Republic in Sligo on St Patrick’s Day by scoring a last minute winner.

The first team that I played for was Limivady United and then when I was nineteen I moved to Ballyclare Comrades. I’m originally from Coleraine but I knew that the Ballyclare team had a good reputation and were good at giving young players a chance on the field. I decided to go and play for them – even though it took me an hour to get to training every week.

I played with them for one year and won ‘Player of the Month’ for the NIFL championship in January before I moved to Glentoran. We had just finished playing the Institute FC in a play-off game in a home and away over two legs and I scored the winner. It was after that game that the manager from Glentoran, Gary Haveron, got in touch. He had been watching the play-off and invited me down to The Oval where I signed my two year contract.

My family were buzzing when I told them I had been signed; they take a big interest in my football and my dad has never missed a match. I feel like I’m ready for it now. I’ve been playing since I was 16 and playing for Glentoran is a great opportunity for me.

We haven’t been told who the first fixture is against but I have already played my debut in Detroit.  It was for the fiftieth anniversary of the Detroit Cougars, when Glentoran, representing NI, went to America to raise the profile of football there. The Glentoran squad exceeded everyone’s expectations as they were the only semi-professional football team that were brought over at that time and they did really well. Going as part of this team in 2017 was a great experience and it was the first time that I met all the boys on the squad. I started the game which drew in a crowd of 5 thousand people. It was such a big crowd which I didn’t expect. It was a bit surreal.

While we were in the US we went to Third Man Records, a famous records store in Detroit. Usually part of the initiation process when joining a new club involves an embarrassing sing along. So while we were in the record store I sang a rendition of ‘Angels’ by Robbie Williams for all the lads. Personally I’m more of a shower singer but it was a bit of craic and a few other guys got up after me. We also got to meet Scott Benson, a Detroit city councilman, and we went on a tour of the city.

Although I’ve always been a keen football player I’m also lucky to be decent at maths and I have tutored for friends and family. You never know where football can take you so in the meantime I’m currently doing my placement year at Randox, working in the Pricing and Tenders department.

I found the opportunity through the university careers portal and at the time I didn’t know that maths could take you into these areas but I’m finding out that a good maths degree can open a lot of doors. I had heard of Randox before as my uncle had previously worked for them and was involved in the early developments of the Randox Science Park. I wasn’t 100% sure what I was going to pursue at university, I had been interested in languages and science but maths was probably my best subject. It sounds simple but that’s honestly the way it was!

It’s been a great experience – I get along with my team very well and I am enjoying the work. I’ve had real hands-on experience during my placement year and I have found that the further I get into my degree the more options are becoming available. I was thinking of doing a masters in maths and also considering doing a PGCE in maths, but I haven’t quite made my mind up about that one yet.

It can be tough trying to balance work and football but I do manage it fit it all in. This past year I’ve been up from 6.30am to get to work and I usually stay on late because I have training after work in Belfast or Crumlin until 8.30pm. After training, I do my own training and practice my shooting to improve my game.

I support Man United as a team but the players whose careers I’d like to emulate would be Pogba and Steven Gerrard. They both play centre mid field and have a similar game to me. Gerrard is a good athlete – there are a lot of guys who can attack and defend but Gerrard is an all-rounded mid fielder. Currently it’s the off season but the pre-season is fast approaching and I’m looking forward to getting stuck in and seeing where my football career will take me.”

For more We Are Randox stories make sure to follow #WeAreRandox on our social media channels.

If you are interested in joining our global team make sure that you check out the Randox careers website to see what new opportunities we have for you.


Students become Randox scientists and engineers for a day at STEM Challenge event

Over 50 students from across Northern Ireland celebrated International Women in Engineering Day on Friday 23rd June, by taking part in the first annual STEM Challenge event, hosted by global healthcare firm Randox Laboratories.

The students, from the Belfast Model School for Girls and Victoria College Belfast, joined female scientists, engineers, software developers and mathematicians from Randox, for a number of interactive activities organised to mark the special day, which is aimed at tackling the gender divide in engineering and other science, technology and maths-related disciplines.

Speaking at the event was Professor Máire O’Neill of Queen’s University Belfast – Professor in the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and former recipient of the British Female Inventors and Innovators Network’s British Female Inventor of the Year award.

Professor O’Neill commented;

 “I’m really delighted to be here today at the Randox STEM event and to have the opportunity to speak with girls who could potentially be the next generation of scientists, mathematicians, software developers, and significantly, on today, International Women in Engineering Day, the next generation of female engineers.

“Engineering is not a job for men.  The representation of engineering as a “masculine” job is a socially constructed one, and at that, an inaccurate one.  The skills required for engineering are found just as readily in the young girls I see here before me today as they are in their male classmates – patience, analysis, communication, empathy and problem solving.

“Enabling these young girls here today to meet with female engineers from Randox provides them with really positive role models who can share their experiences and hopefully encourage the students to really consider what it is to be an engineer.”

The students had the opportunity to ask the Randox representatives all the questions they wanted to know about working in STEM, and were treated to a tour of the facilities at the recently acquired Randox Science Park, which has become the new headquarters for the company.

Linda Magee, Head of Human Resources at Randox added;

“We want young girls to know that engineering is as much a viable career choice for them as it is for their male counterparts.  At Randox our female to male ratio of engineers is significantly higher than the UK average – 15.8% as opposed to only 9% – but we still have a long way to go and we feel quite strongly that we can utilize Randox’s status within the Northern Irish business sector to really spearhead a paradigm shift in how we view engineering disciplines.”

Mark Gray, Biology Teacher at Victoria College Belfast said;

 “We were delighted to hear that Randox were hosting a schools event in support of their STEM campaign, to celebrate International Women in Engineering Day. It’s important to give girls the chance to get involved and gain hands-on experience within these different disciplines and deliver the message from an early age that they have the same opportunities as boys in every part of life, especially their careers.

“By giving them more information and explaining the benefits of STEM we’re opening the doors for girls into areas that they might not have considered before. We need to make certain that young girls have the right support and experience to choose the right job in their future professions and a campaign like this offers us the perfect opportunity to do so.”

The Randox STEM challenge on International Women in Engineering Day, Friday 23rd June, was the culmination of a week-long initiative celebrating women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and maths, and in leadership roles across Northern Ireland.

For further information contact Randox PR on 028 9445 1016 or email RandoxPR@randox.com


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