Transferrin

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Transferrin

Reagent | Transferrin

Key Benefits

Excellent precision

The Transferrin assay has a precision of less than 5% CV

Applications available

For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers including the RX series

Strong correlation

The Transferrin assay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.98 against another commercially available method utilising a BCR/CAP/IFCC CRM 470 international standard

Randox Transferrin (Immunoturbidmetric)

  • Immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable to expiry at 2-8⁰C
  • Measuring range 7.60-550 mg/dl
  • Applications available
Cat NoSize    
TF3831R1 6 x 20ml
R2 3 x 14ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online

Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is Transferrin assay used for?

Transferrin (siderophilin) is the principal iron binding and transport protein in human plasma and can bind two molecules of iron. The normal range for healthy adults is 200-400 mg/dl. Iron availability in the plasma regulates transferrin levels which increase when plasma iron is low.

Transferrin levels increase during pregnancy and oestrogen administration and correlate closely with Total Iron Binding Capacity of serum. Plasma transferrin levels are associated with a range of conditions including anaemia, iron deficiency,inflammation or malignancy, liver disease, malnutrition and protein loss.

Transferrin can also be described as a preventative antioxidant and acts by binding iron in a redox inactive form. This process is extremely important as free iron is capable of stimulating the production of harmful free radicals

Antioxidant Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the antioxidant panel, please click here

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here

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Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)

Reagent | Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)

Key Benefits

Exceptional correlation

The TIBC assay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.9 against another commercially available method

Eliminates negative bias

Traditional calculation methods using the unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) and serum iron (TIBC = UIBC + serum iron) have a significant negative bias compared with direct TIBC methods. Randox’s TIBC assay eliminates this bias

Excellent precision

The TIBC assay has a precision of less than 4% CV

Randox Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) (Colorimetric)

  • Colorimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Measuring range 57.7 – 672 µg/dl
  • Eliminates negative bias
  • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8⁰C
  • Minimal interferences
Cat NoSize
TI4064R1 4 x 9ml
R2 4 x 4ml
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TI8065R1 4 x 8.7ml
R2 4 x 4.9ml
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TI8375R1 4 x 10ml
R2 4 x 5.1ml
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What is Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) assay used for?

Iron is transported in the blood by the serum protein transferrin. Transferrin is normally 30% saturated, that is 30% of the iron-binding sites contain an iron atom. The total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) is the amount of iron needed to 100% saturate transferrin. TIBC reflects iron status: levels are elevated when iron levels are low; therefore it is useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of iron deficiency anaemia and iron deficiency in late pregnancy. Abnormal levels of TIBC can point towards a variety of disease states such as hereditary haemochromatosis, a common genetic disorder where iron levels are excessive, other anaemias, liver disease and malnutrition.

Antioxidant Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the antioxidant panel, please click here

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Glutathione Reductase

Reagent | Glutathione Reductase

Key Benefits

Applications available

For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers

Exceptional correlation

The Glutathione Reductase assay showed a correlation of r=0.988 against another commercially available method

Excellent linearity

387 U/l, removing the need for sample dilution

Randox Glutathione Reductase (UV)

  • UV method
  • Lyophilised reagents
  • Working reagent stable for 2 days when stored at 2-8°C
  • Measuring range 9.69 – 387 U/l

Ordering Information

Cat NoSize    
GR2368R1 5 x 5ml
R2 5 x 3ml
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Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is Glutathione Reductase assay used for?

Glutathione Reductase is required for the regeneration of reduced glutathione which is important for normal cellular metabolism. This enzyme is often discussed in association with Glutathione Peroxidase, which requires reduced glutathione for activation. Glutathione Reductase is responsible for maintaining levels of reduced glutathione which has many important functions in the cell. Glutathione plays a role in protein folding and the maintenance of reduced pools of vitamin C and E. Reduced levels of this enzyme have been described in several diseases.

  • Seghrouchni, I., et al. (2002) Oxidative stress parameters in type I, type II and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus; insulin treatment efficiency. Clin. Chim. Acta. 321(1-2): 89-96
  • Zachwieja, J. et al. (2003) Decreased antioxidant activity in hypercholesterolemic children with nephrotic syndrome. Med. Sci. Monit., 9:CR287-291
  • Malinowski, E., et al. (2004) The effect of some drugs injection to pregnant heifers on blood antioxidant status. Pol. J. Vet. Sci.,7: 91-95
  • Banfi, G., et al. (2006) Plasma oxidative stress biomarkers, nitric oxide and heat shock protein 70 in trained elite soccer players.Eur. J. Appl. Physiol., 96: 483-486
  • Celik, I., et al. (2006) Antioxidant and immune potential marker enzymes assessment in the various tissues of rats exposed to indolacetic acid and kinetin: A drink water study. Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology. 86: 180-185
  • Tátrai, E., et al. (2006) Redox status and expression of chemokines in the rat lungs on exposure to asbestos and asbestos substituents. Neuro. Endocrinol. Lett. 27 Suppl 2: 40-43
  • Drelich, G., et al. (2007) (Article in Polish) Imbalance of oxidoreductive status in suicidal antidepressant drugs poisoning. Przegl. Lek. 64: 258-259
  • Čolak, E. et al. (2008) Biomarkers of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative defense in type 2 diabetes mellitus-comparative analysis. Biochemia Medica. 18 (2): 42-51
  • Perše, M., et al. (2009) Effect of high-fat mixed-lipid diet and exercise on the antioxidant system in skeletal and cardiac muscles of rats with colon carcinoma. Pharmacol. Rep. 61(5): 909-916
  • Biljak, V.K.. et al. (2010) Glutathione cycle in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cell Biochem. Funct. 28(6): 448-453
  • Singh, N. et al. (2010) Adverse health effects due to arsenic exposure: Modification by dietary supplementation of jaggery in mice. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 242(3): 247-255
  • Djordjevic, J., et al. (2011) Fluoxetine affects antioxidant system and promotes apoptotic signalling in Wistar rat liver. Eur. J.Pharmacol. 659(1): 61-66
  • Huo, H.Z., et al. (2011) Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of licorice extract against CCl4-induced oxidative damage in rats. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 12: 6529-6543
  • Voljč., M., et al. (2011) Evaluation of different vitamin E recommendations and bioactivity of α-tocopherol isomers in broiler nutrition by measuring oxidative stress in vivo and the oxidative stability of meat. Poult. Sci. 90(7): 1478-1488
  • Dogliotti, G., et al. (2012) Natural zeolites chabazite/phillipsite/analcime increase blood levels of antioxidant enzymes. J. Clin. Biochem. Nutr. 50(3): 195-198
  • Gravina, L., et al. (2012) Influence of nutrient intake on antioxidant capacity, muscle damage and white blood cell count in female soccer players. J. Int. Soc. Sports Nutr. 9(1): 32
  • Hübner-Wózniak E., et al. (2012) Effect of rugby training on blood antioxidant defenses in able-bodied and spinal cord injured players. Spinal Cord 50(3): 253-256
  • Herbet, M., et al. (2013) Influence of combined therapy with rosuvastatin and amitriptyline on the oxidation-reduction status in rats. Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica. 70(5): 913-917

Diabetes Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the diabetes panel, please click here


IgA

Reagent | IgA

Key Benefits

Excellent precision

The IgA assay showed a precision of less than 3% CV

Exceptional correlation

The assay showed a correlation of r=0.98 against another commercially available method

Interference

There is no cross reaction with IgG and IgM under the conditions of the assay. Extremely lipaemic or haemolytic samples and high levels of ionic detergents may interfere in the assay

Other features

  • Immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8⁰C
  • Measuring range 0.21-6.25 g/l
Cat NoSize    
IA3832R1 3 x 20ml
R2 3 x 14ml
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IA8046R1 5 x 8.7ml
R2 5 x 3.9ml
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Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is IgA assay used for?

Measurement of IgA is used to diagnose diseases of the respiratory tract e.g. tuberculosis, Crohn’s disease and early cirrhosis of the liver. It is also useful in monitoring therapy of IgA myeloma and evaluating IgA immunity. IgA in colostrum and milk is important in neonatal defence against infection.

The Randox IgA assay is an immunoturbidimetric end-point method for manual use and on automated analysers. The increase in turbidity in a sample containing human IgA is measured at 340 nm. By constructing a standard curve from the absorbances of standards, the IgA concentration of a sample can be determined.

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here


Haptoglobin

Reagent | Haptoglobin

Key Benefits

Excellent traceability

Standardised to Certified Reference Material (CRM Da470k/IFCC)

Exceptional correlation

A correlation coefficient of r=0.97 was obtained against another commercially available kit

Excellent stability

Onboard reagent stability of 28 days. Calibration is only required every seven days

Other features and benefits

  • Immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid reagents
  • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8°C
  • Measuring range 0.13-3.68 g/l
  • Fully automated applications available for a wide range of clinical chemistry analysers

Ordering information

Cat NoSize    
HP3886R1 1 x 12ml
R2 2 x 3.825ml
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HP8151R1 1 x 12ml (L)
R2 2 x 4.2ml
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Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is Haptoglobin assay used for?

Haptoglobin measurements are used in the diagnosis of haemolytic anaemia and to distinguish it from other types of anaemia. In haemolytic anaemia, haptoglobin levels in the blood decrease significantly. Low levels however may also indicate red blood cell destruction due to sickle cell anaemia or thalassemia. In certain cases of liver disease haptoglobin levels may also be low, as the liver cannot manufacture normal levels of the protein.

As an acute phase reactant haptoglobin levels in the blood are significantly increased in response to infection, inflammation, burns, surgery and trauma. However, haptoglobin is not generally used to diagnose or monitor these conditions.

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here


Complement C4 Reagent

Reagent | Complement C4

Key Benefits of the Randox Complement C4 reagent

Exceptional correlation with standard methods

The Randox methodology was compared against other commercially available methods and the Randox Complement C4 assay showed a correlation coefficient of r=0.98

Wide measuring range

The healthy range for Complement C4 is 7 -49 mg/dl. The Randox Complement C4 assay can comfortably detect levels outside of the healthy range measuring between 2.90 – 152 mg/dl

Excellent stability

Stable until expiry date when stored at +2 to +8°C

Other features of the Randox Complement C4 reagent

  • Immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable until expiry date when stored at +2 to +8°C
  • Measuring range 2.90 – 152 mg/dl

Ordering information

Cat NoSize    
CM3846R1 3 x 20ml
R2 3 x 6ml
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Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is the Complement C4 assay used for?

What is Complement C4?

The complement system is one of the major mechanisms of innate immunology consisting of more than 30 plasma and membrane-associated serum proteins which evokes cytolytic immune responses to pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, chemical tissue damage and anything that is classified as foreign to the body. The complement system can be activated through three major pathways: classical, lectin or alternative. Once activated, reactions occur for antibody opsonisation (the process by which a phagocyte marks a pathogen for ingestion and elimination) to fight against the foreign bodies.  Activation can also occur when the body produces antibodies for its own tissues that it views as being foreign, which is known as an autoimmune disorder.

During the activation process, Complement C4 splits down into C4b and C4a (peptide). C4b acts as an opsonin and remains bound to the complex at the surface of the pathogen which activates the next step of the process. The small peptide, C4a diffuses away and acts as a chemotactic factor and an inflammatory paracrine.

The Randox Complement C4 assay is used for the quantitative in vitro determination of complement C4 concentration in serum.  The Randox Complement C4 assay allows for the diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune disorders associated with abnormal levels of complement C4 including lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).  Higher than normal results may be indicative of cancer or ulcerative whereas lower than normal results may be indicative of lupus, hepatitis, or cirrhosis.

Cell-bound levels of processed complement activation products, especially E-C4d (erythrocyte-bound C4) is a biomarker in the diagnosis and monitoring of systematic lupus erythematous (SLE). For more information on SLE, please click here.

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here


Complement C3 Reagent

Reagent | Complement C3

Key Benefits of the Randox Complement C3 reagent

Exceptional correlation with standard methods

The Randox methodology was compared against other commercially available methods and the Randox Complement C3 assay showed a correlation coefficient of r=0.98

Wide measuring range

The healthy range for Complement C3 is 58 – 170 mg/dl.  The Randox Complement C3 assay can comfortably detect levels outside of the healthy range measuring between 13 – 502 mg/dl.

Excellent stability

Stable until expiry date when stored at +2 to +8°C

Other features of the Randox Complement C3 reagent

  • Immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable until expiry date when stored at +2 to +8°C
  • Measuring range 13 – 502 mg/dl

Ordering information

Cat NoSize    
CM3845R1 3 x 20ml
R2 3 x 6ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online

Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is the Complement C3 assay used for?

What is Complement C3?

The complement system is one of the major mechanisms of innate immunology consisting of more than 30 plasma and membrane-associated serum proteins which evokes cytolytic immune responses to pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, chemical tissue damage and anything that is classified as foreign to the body. The complement system can be activated through three major pathways: classical, lectin or alternative. Once activated, reactions occur for antibody opsonisation (the process by which a phagocyte marks a pathogen for ingestion and elimination) to fight against the foreign bodies.  Activation can also occur when the body produces antibodies for its own tissues that it views as being foreign, which is known as an autoimmune disorder. For more information on autoimmune disorders, please click here

During the activation process, Complement C3 splits down into C3b and C3a (peptide). C3b acts as an opsonin and remains bound to the complex at the surface of the pathogen which activates the next step of the process. The small peptide, C3a diffuses away and acts as a chemotactic factor and an inflammatory paracrine.

The Randox Complement C3 assay is used for the quantitative in vitro determination of complement C3 concentration in serum.  The Randox Complement C3 assay allows for the diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune disorders associated with abnormal levels of complement C3 including lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).  Higher than normal results may be indicative of cancer or ulcerative whereas lower than normal results may be indicative of lupus, hepatitis, or cirrhosis.

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to visit more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here


Rheumatoid Factor

Reagent | Rheumatoid Factor

Rheumatoid Factor Key Benefits

Exceptional correlation

The Rheumatoid Factor assay showed a correlation of r=0.99 against another commercially available method

Applications available

For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers including the RX series

Excellent stability

Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8⁰C

Superior Method

Latex Enhanced Immunoturbidimetric method

Ultimate convenience

Liquid ready-to-use reagents

Wide measuring range

Measuring range 6.72-104 lU/ml

 Ordering information

Cat NoSize    
RF3836R1 2 x 20ml
R2 2 x 8ml
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RF8063R1 2 x 8.7ml
R2 2 x 4.7ml
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RF8345R1 1 x 11.7ml
R2 1 x 5.7ml
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Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is Rheumatoid Factor assay used for?

Research has shown that both environmental and genetic factors can affect the production of RF with various biological properties. Although they may be found in all immunoglobulin classes, the RF most frequently detected is the IgM type; present in about 75% of adult patients with RA and about 10% of children with juvenile RA. RF have also been observed in the serum of patients with lupus erythematosus, hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, syphilis and various other conditions; but the RF titre is much lower than in RA.

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here

Rapid Tests / Serology Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the rapid tests / serology panel, please click here


HbA1c

Reagent | HbA1c

HbA1c (Indirect)

Key Benefits

Latex Enhanced Immunoturbidimetric method

The Randox assay utilises a latex enhanced immunoturbidimetric method for superior performance

Exceptional correlation to standard methods

A correlation coefficient of 0.98 was obtained with another commercially available method

Excellent precision

The HbA1c assay showed a precision of less than 5% CV

Other Features

  • Latex enhanced immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8°C
  • Measuring range 0.25-2.4 g/dl
  • Haemoglobin denaturant supplied with the kit
Cat NoSize    
HA3830R1 3 x 14ml
R2 3 x 14ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
HA8321R1 4 x 7.8ml
R2 4 x 7.8ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online

Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

HbA1c (Direct)

  • Latex enhanced immunoagglutination method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8°C
  • For use with RX series of clinical chemistry analysers
Cat CodeSize    
HA8123R1 2 x 16.2ml
R2 2 x 8.2ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
HA8379R1 4 x 12.7ml
R2 4 x 6ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
HA4068R1 4 x 20ml
R2 4 x 8.6ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online

Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is HbA1c assay used for?

The concentration of HbA1c in the blood of diabetic patients increases with rising blood glucose levels and is representative of the mean blood glucose level over the preceding six to eight weeks. HbA1c can therefore be described as a long term indicator of diabetic control unlike blood glucose which is only a short term indicator of diabetic control.

It is recommended that HbA1c levels are monitored every three to four months. In patients who have recently changed their therapy or in those who have gestational diabetes it may be beneficial to measure HbA1c levels more frequently, at two to four week intervals.

Diabetes Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the diabetes panel, please click here

Specific Proteins Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the specific proteins panel, please click here


Glucose

Reagent | Glucose

Key Benefits

Wide measuring range

The Randox Glucose assay has a wide measuring range of 0.200 – 35.5 mmol/l which will comfortably detect levels outside of the healthy range

Exceptional correlation

The Glucose assay showed a correlation of r=0.99 against another commercially available method

Excellent stability

Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8⁰C

Randox Glucose (GOD-PAP & Hexokinase)

  • GOD-PAP and Hexokinase method
  • Liquid and lypohilised reagents
  • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8°C
  • Measuring range 0.200-35.5 mmol/l

Randox Glucose GOD-PAP

Cat NoSize    
GL80384 x 68ml (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
GL36410 x 100ml (S)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
GL26142 x 500ml (S) (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
GL38159 x 51ml (S) (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
GL83184 x 20ml (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
(L) Indicates liquid option (S) Indicates standard included in kit

Randox Glucose Hexokinase

Cat NoSize    
GL3816R1 4 x 51ml (L)
R2 3 x 20ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
GL38814 x 50mlEnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
GL8319R1 4 x 20ml (L)
R2 4 x 6.5ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
(L) Indicates liquid option

Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is Glucose assay used for?

Glucose is the primary source of energy for the body. The body obtains glucose through the digestion of the sugar and starch in carbohydrates. Glucose is vital and interacts with the digestive and endocrine system. Due to this it is imperative to maintain glucose levels within the normal range.

  • Bor, M.V., et al. Serum fructosamine and fructosamine-albumin ratio as screening tests for gestational diabetes mellitus. Arch. Gynecol. Obstet. 1999, 262(3-4): 105-111
  • Ranganath, L., et al. The effect of circulating non-esterified fatty acids on the entero-insular axis. European Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1999, 29(1): 27-32
  • Joshi, S., et al. Fish oil supplementation of rats during pregnancy reduces adult disease in their offspring. J. Nutr., 2003, 133: 3170-3174
  • Sánchez-Rodríguez, M.A., et al. Antioxidant capacity in relationship to serum lipid peroxides levels in healthy elderly of Mexico City. 2004, 38(2): 193-198
  • Panagia, M., et al. PPAR-α activation required for decreased glucose uptake and increased susceptibility to injury during ischemia. Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol. 2005, 288: H2677-H2683
  • Chen, C-W and Cheng, H-H. A rice bran oil diet increases LDL-receptor and HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expressions and insulin sensitivity in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes. J. Nutr. 2006, 136: 1472-1476
  • Gupta, V. et al. Effect of short term cigarette smoking on insulin resistance and lipid profile in asymptomatic adults. Indian J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 2006, 50(3): 285-290
  • Lutoslawska, G., et al. Relationship between fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and plasma glycerol and free fatty acid levels in physically active males and females. Biol. Sport 2006, 23: 341-351
  • Miyashita, M., et al. Exercise and postpandrial lipemia: effect of continuous compared with intermittent activity patterns. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2006, 83(1): 24-29
  • Mula-Abed, W-A. S. and Aziz, S.B. Serum fructosamine (glycated protein) and related biochemical parameters during normal pregnancy. JBMS Journal of the Bahrain Medical Society 2006, 18(3): 115-122
  • Camarillo-Romero, M.S. et al. Riesgo cardiovascular en trabajadores universiatarios. (Article in Spanish). BioQCliNat. 2007,4(13): 9-15
  • Halley Castillo E., et al. Body Mass Index and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among children and adolescents in two Mexican populations. J. Adolesc. Health. 2007, 40(6): 521-526
  • James, A.P., et al. Prior exercise does not affect chylomicron particle number following a mixed meal of moderate fat content.Lipids Health Dis. 2007, 6: 8
  • Mineo, D., et al. Effects of lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema on glycolipidic hormones. Chest. 2008, 134(1): 30-37
  • Aziz, N., et al. Antihypertensive, antioxidant, antidyslipidemic and endothelial modulating activities of a polyherbal formulation (POL-10). Vascul. Pharmacol. 2009, 50(1-2): 57-64
  • Bajaj, S., et al. A case-control study on insulin resistance, metabolic co-variates and prediction score in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Indian J. Med. Res. 2009, 129: 285-292
  • Chou T-W., et al. A Rice bran oil diet improves lipid abnormalities and suppress hyperinsulinemic responses in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced Type 2 diabetes. J.Clin. Biochem.Nutr. 2009, 45(1): 29-36
  • García-Montalvo, E.A. et al. Fluoride exposure impairs glucose tolerance via decreased insulin expression and oxidative stress.Toxicology 2009, 263: 75-83
  • Hossein-nezhad, A., et al. Association of VDR gene polymorphism with insulin resistance in diabetic patients. Iranian Journal of Diabetes and Lipid Disorders. 2009, 143-150Kanakkaparambil, R., et al. B-vitamin and homocysteine status determines ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment in sheep. Biol. Reprod. 2009, 80(4): 743-752
  • Li, T-L. and Rush, B. The effects of prolonged strenuous exercise on salivary secretion of IgA subclasses in men. Int. J. Sport Exerc. Sci. 2009, 1(3): 69-752
  • Mirzaei, K., et al. Variation in the vistafin gene may alter the required dosage of oral antidiabetic agents in type 2 diabetic patients. Iranian Journal of Diabetes and Lipid Disorders 2009, 87-94
  • Režen, T., et al. Effect of CAR activation on selected metabolic pathways in normal and hyperlipidemic mouse livers. BMC Genomics. 2009, 10: 384
  • Rhodes, P., et al. Adult-onset obesity reveals prenatal programming of glucose-insulin sensitivity in male sheep nutrient restricted during late gestation. PloS ONE 2009, 4(10): e7393
  • Sébert, S.P., et al. Maternal nutrient restriction between early and midgestation and its impact upon appetite regulation after juvenile obesity. Endocrinology 2009, 150(2): 634-641
  • Usman K, M., et al. Correlation between non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and serum sialic acid. Annals 2009, 15(3): 152-154
  • Velasco-Martínez, R.M., et al. Obesity and insulin resistance among adolescents from Chiapas. Nutr. Hosp. 2009, 24(2)
  • Camarillo-Romero, E., et al. (Article in Spanish). Difficulties in the classification of metabolic syndrome. The example of adolescents in Mexico. Salud Publica Mex. 2010, 52(6): 524-527
  • Iffen, T.S. and Usoro C.A.O. The effect of ethanolic extract of Larpotea ovalifolia plants growing in Calabar on antioxidants status of streptozocin induced diabetic rats. Global Journal of Pharmacology 2010, 4(1): 01-05
  • Itam, E.H., et al. Haemapoietic and immunological changes in multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MDSTZ) rat models. European Journal of Scientific Research. 2010, 43(2): 283-289
  • Mahadik, S.R. et al. Role of adipocytokines in insulin resistance: Studies from Urban Western Indian Population. Int. J. Diabetes & Metab. 2010, 18(9): 35-42
  • Akpaso, M.I. et al. Effect of combined leaf extracts of Vernonia amygdalina (Bitter leaf) and Gongronema latifolium (Utazi) on the pancreatic β-cells of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. British Journal of Medicine and Medical Research. 2011, 1(1): 24-34
  • Chu, N.F et al. Prevalence and anthropometric risk of metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adolescents. ISRN Cardiol. 2011, 2011: 743640
  • Gupta, V., et al. Association of circulating resistin with metabolic risk factors in Indian females having metabolic syndrome.Toxicol. Int. 2011, 18(2): 168-172
  • Singal, S., et al. Is cardiovascular risk more in diabetics because of lower apolipoprotein A1 levels rather than higher Apo B/Apo A1 ratio? Int. J. Biomed. Res. 2011, 2(2): 143-150
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Diabetes Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the diabetes panel, please click here

Veterinary Panel

For more information or to view more reagents within the veterinary panel, please click here


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