International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

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International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Why this Day is Important

The purpose of International Day of Women and Girls in Science (IDGWS) is to bring everyone forward for sustainable and fair development in society. The international day allows us to celebrate women’s achievements in science and places the necessary focus on ensuring girls are equally equipped with the skills necessary to enter a career in STEM.

This year commences the 8th year of International Day of Women and Girls in Science and aims to particularly focus on the role of women and girls in science in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As Gender equality has always been a fundamental issue for the United Nations, the empowerment of women and girls will make a vital contribution, not only to economic development, but also across all the Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In doing so the IDWGS aims to connect women and girls in science to the international community, strengthening connections to science, society and the development of strategies aimed towards the future.

*Click the individual photographs for their full interview*


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our fifth interview is with Marketing Manager, Lynsey Adams. 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I have always been interested in biology and what makes us unique.  For that reason, I chose to study Genetics at Queens University Belfast.  I have been lucky enough to work in the life sciences industry ever since.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

When I first came to Randox 15 years ago, I started off in Technical Support.  I then progressed into the Marketing department and worked my way up to where I am today, to be the Head of Marketing. My role predominantly involves Marketing our scientific product ranges as well as B2C product offerings and sponsorships. Having a background in science has helped me to excel in my Marketing role and I am fortunate to be able to have the opportunity to do both the things that I enjoy and am passionate about.

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

There has been an increase of women in STEM in general, whether that be more females studying STEM related subjects at university or exploring a career in STEM.  Throughout the years, I have been privileged to work with so many females in managerial and authoritative roles within Randox.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

Throughout the years I have been fortunate enough to have female teachers and lecturers provide crucial STEM related education who encourage females to pursue a career in STEM. During my working career I have experienced the same opportunities as other colleagues and seen an increase in women exceling in science.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

Awareness of the varied career paths available within STEM related industries would be beneficial.  The availability of work experience, placement, apprenticeship and graduate programmes like those offered at Randox helps to expose both males and females to the many exciting opportunities in the field.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

STEM is an equal playing field, so have confidence in your own ability and intelligence to get to where you want to be.

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our fourth interview is with Head of RCLS Quality, Emma McGoldrick. 

 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I have always been interested in how things work.  I enjoyed Maths and Science at school and chose to study Biomedical Science at university because it gave an overview of different areas of science and had a lot of practical modules.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

I started in Randox in 2018 working in the RTS laboratory doing routine analysis.  During the pandemic I moved across to RCLS and was involved in the Covid-19 testing as a PCR shift lead and eventually a Deputy Lab Manager.  In 2022, when the testing demands were decreasing, I moved into the RCLS Quality Department and became the Head of Department.

The Quality Department are responsible for ensuring the validity of results that are sent out to our customers, allowing them to have confidence in our service.  The Quality Department are also responsible for maintaining our accreditation status and applying for any new accreditations for new testing.

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

Over the years I have seen an increase in the number of women, not only in science, but in positions of responsibility or authority.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

I wouldn’t say I have found it more difficult as such but at times you can be very conscious of the fact that it can be a very male dominated field and as a result of that feel that you have to work harder or do more to be taken seriously.

Fortunately, in the course of my career I have had a lot of female managers and colleagues.  In fact, out of pure circumstance my team is predominantly women which is quite nice to work in a very supportive environment.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

I think it is important to showcase careers in Science and STEM to give young girls the insight into what they can achieve.  It is important to support young girls in school and allow them to feel heard and encouraged that they can do whatever they choose without any undue pressure in adhering to societal gender roles.  Outreach to primary school age girls as well as high school age girls and showing them the variety of careers available to them in STEM is an important step in encouraging more women to go into STEM.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

I would say to any women starting out in STEM to keep going and pursue their career path and not to be put off.  There is plenty of room for women in STEM and they shouldn’t be afraid to take up space in the field.

 

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our third interview is with Business Development Manager, Remy Patton. 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I was always interested in Biology and studied Biomedical Science at University in Edinburgh. During my degree I spent a lot of time in the lab, but after 4 years of studying I knew working in a lab environment full time wasn’t for me. I wanted a sales role, staying within the medical industry. After taking a gap year I applied for the Graduate Scheme at Randox. I have been given the opportunity to progress quickly in this role and now get the best of both worlds – engaging with customers, while also using my Scientific background.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

I am a Sales Manager, overseeing some of our European markets. I have been working at Randox for just over 3 years and am lucky enough to get the opportunity to travel internationally every month. While on work trips I visit current customers, build relationships with potential new customers, all while promoting our Randox Quality Control portfolio. Being in the field also allows me to see Randox products being used in real-life scenarios. Ultimately, the products we sell ensures accurate patient results, which is our number one priority.

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

Women are gradually infiltrating into this industry, due to STEM subjects being encouraged at school from a young age. We now have successful role models, inspiring future generations of female STEM workers. In Randox, we have career focused women working in many different departments, such as Manufacturing, Engineering and Logistics – which were once male dominated sectors.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

In this role, I have never felt disadvantaged to be female and have actively been encouraged to progress in the company and further my career. I’ve had the same opportunities as my male colleagues and feel that I can provide the same quality of service to the company.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

We can promote equal opportunities for both male and female candidates and make it clear that females are as successful in the science industry as males. We can also team up with local schools and universities to hold workshops, to show women exactly how many different opportunities there are to explore within science.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

My advice would be for women to believe in their abilities to succeed!

 

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our second interview is with Lead Biomedical Engineer- Sarah Hamilton.

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

At A-Level I studied Technology & Design, Biology & Chemistry. I always enjoyed the process of facing a problem scenario and working through design processes to form a solution. The problems I identified were always centred around healthcare issues. During A-Levels, I also had the opportunity to take part in the Sentinus Golden Crest Award, an initiative promoting STEM in schools. I went on to pursue a career in Engineering largely down to the great exposure I had to the industry during my time at school. Biomedical Engineering appealed to me most as it had the added aspects of applying biological/biochemical principles to technology in ways that improve healthcare provision and create products that directly impact quality of life. As part of my degree, I had an Industrial placement year, this experience was within Medical Device R&D where I had some amazing mentors who helped me see that Engineering R&D was definitely the correct career path for me.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

My role within Randox is Lead Biomedical Engineer within the Engineering R&D department. I started in 2017 having graduated from Ulster University as a Biomedical Engineer. During the last 6 years I have progressed to a Team Leader role. In this role I co-ordinate a team of 7 people from Senior to Placement Biomedical Engineers.

Within this team we work across multiple projects which are all in different stages of development. My main role is to plan and facilitate the completion of testing ranging from early prototype development through to Verification & Validation. The Biomedical Engineering role involves working within a multidisciplinary team of Mechanical, Electrical & Embedded Design Engineers, Software Developers & Testers and Scientists (Chemists & Physicists). In Engineering, we also work alongside Assay Development Scientists and Lab Scientists. In doing so we ensure our product requirements are in line with user needs and performance is as expected.

 

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

Comparing my time at school & university to now, there has been a noticeable change in the emphasis put on STEM careers. It is great to see employers from a variety of industries participating in more outreach programmes aimed at both primary, secondary and tertiary education levels, similar to the Sentinus Award which first got me interested in a STEM career. Many of my colleagues, and I, have participated in different events aimed at promoting careers in STEM. And I know many companies have diversity and inclusion programmes with aims of attracting more females into STEM roles at both junior and more senior levels. I feel that this has helped change attitudes of both woman and men from what was previously considered normal within STEM.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

When I started as a graduate engineer, I was the only female in a team of 15 men, so, while I have found the industry still quite predominately male, I don’t believe this poses any setbacks for starting out in a STEM career or for career progression. Currently, within my own team of Biomedical Engineers, we have an even split of woman to men which is a positive step in the right direction, and I look forward to seeing that equality normalised in future. Overall, getting to work within a group of likeminded people who work together to solve multiple complex problems is extremely rewarding.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

I think improving and promoting initiatives that provide exposure/insight into the STEM industry in schools is one of the best ways to inspire the next generation. It allows more girls to see the many different roles in the STEM industry which they might not otherwise have been aware of or considered pursuing.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

Have confidence to make sure you are heard.

 

 

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

On Saturday 11th February, we are celebrating International day of Women and girls in Science! This day is an opportunity to celebrate and promote equal access to science for women and girls. 

Ahead of the 11th, we have interviewed five influential Women who fulfil STEM based roles across Randox Laboratories. They have shared their experiences and thoughts on Women and girls in the science industry.

Our first interview is with Head of technical Services- Louise Lynn.

 

Why did you pursue a career in STEM?

I enjoyed science at school and it was an easy decision to continue science through to A-level. I went on to study Biochemistry at Queens University, Belfast and during my time there I heard about Randox.  I applied for various jobs when I graduated, but Randox interested me the most and was most applicable for my degree.

 

What is your role in Randox and how long have you worked in the company for?

I am currently Head of Technical Services in Randox, overseeing the Global Technical Support and Applications Teams.

I have been working in Randox for almost 25 years!  I started in the R&D lab during the development of our Liquid Enzyme reagents, and quickly moved into Technical Support.  I have held various roles within Technical Support over the years and have seen many changes in that time.  As a department we support the Randox Clinical products, dealing with enquiries, complaints and troubleshooting, as well as customer training.  No two days are the same.

I enjoy dealing directly with the customers and building those relationships. Working in Technical Support has given me the opportunity to travel and visit labs globally which has been very interesting and allows you to see our products in use and is always a reminder that ultimately there is a patient depending on our products to manage their health.

During the pandemic I was also involved in setting up the Covid Customer Support Team which was one of the most challenging times in my career, but also a very positive experience.

 

What change have you seen for women in science over the years?

During my time at university and throughout my career I have worked alongside many females, however I have seen an increase in female engineers over more recent years, which is great to see in one of the more male dominated sectors of the business.

 

Have you found it harder or any different going into your career in science as a woman?

Throughout my career at Randox I have had both male and female managers.  We have been very fortunate that everyone is given an equal opportunity within the company and we have always had females in senior management positions.  At no stage in my career have I found being a female has caused me to struggle or consider changing my career path.  I was also given flexibility when my children were young, but this did not prevent me from progressing my career once I was ready to do so again.

 

How do you think we can encourage more women to go into the science industry?

Female scientists and engineers going into schools and talking about what they do.  Many young people don’t know what they want to do and getting their attention at an early age and hearing real life career stories first hand can have a huge impact.

 

If you have one piece of advice as a woman starting out the STEM industry, what would it be?

Decide what you want to do and have confidence in yourself that you can do it, even if it is in a male dominated sector.  You will make mistakes, but that is science, learn from them and move on.

For more information, please contact Market@randox.com

 


Randox Equine Awards NI 2022

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Randox Congratulates Manor Equine Vets on winning Best Vet Practice Equine Award 2022

Randox would like to congratulate Manor Equine Vets on winning the Best Vet Practise award at the Randox Equine Awards NI 2022. The Best Veterinary Practise category also included a highly commended award for Oldstone Veterinary Clinic.

Quirine Tettelaar, owner of Manor Equine Vets said “I was very happy to win the award and it was a big surprise! I would like to thank all my lovely clients, friends, and family for their support over the last couple years since starting my business. Hard work and dedication really pays off. It was lovely to read all the comments people left to vote, that was the best part of the awards! I feel really appreciated.”

This event was hosted by Raymond Bready and held at the Titanic Hotel Belfast on Saturday 25th June 2022.

With over 400 guests attending, Randox highlighted the new VeraSTAT-V test which detects the earliest signs of inflammation in horse blood. This stable side test is easy to use and provides quantitative results in six minutes.

Randox testing allows for a healthy horse and healthy rider.

Manor Equine Vets, Quirine Tettelaar and Randox’s Connor Gallagher Celebrate Best Vet Award at The Randox Equine Awards NI 2022

For press enquiries please contact Ellen Watson in the Randox PR team:  randoxpr@randox.com

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Biomedical Science Day 2022

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Biomedical Science Day 2022

Biomedical Science Day is taking place this year on Thursday 9th June 2022. This is an annual celebration to increase the awareness of Biomedical Science and to promote to the public the importance of it.

Biomedical scientists play a key role in diagnosis, quality development and assurance, treatment, research, and development in the modern medical sciences. To celebrate and give recognition we have interviewed one of our RCLS clinical deputy managers, Jayme Hamilton.

 

This is what Jayme has to say about his role in Biomedical Science:

 

 

1. What attracted you to pursue a career in biomedical science?

My degree was in Biological Sciences with Professional Studies. Through it, I was able to design my degree based in my own interests and curiosities, which drew me to exploring the molecular and chemical pathways that elicit biological pathways and also how biotechnology is opening up a future to personalised health and therapies. What I find interesting it how a complete complement of biomarkers needs to be assessed to offer a full illustration of what’s going on under the skin.

2. How many different labs have you worked in?

I have been fortunate to work within several Laboratories to some capacity early in my career. I had a very fulfilling placement within a Method Development and Validation lab at a pharmaceutical company, as well as completing a challenging honours project in population genetics in my final year of university.  Since joining Randox, I have had opportunities to work across several Clinical and Molecular Laboratories with talented colleagues from all sorts of backgrounds; within Liverpool and London in England, Holywood and Antrim in N. Ireland and Los Angeles in California.

 

3. Do you enjoy the practical or theoretical aspect of biomedical science?

Theoretical- I have a drive to learn and understand and thankfully in science that is a continuous journey, as new forms of diagnostics and analysis are born and our understanding can grow or even change.  With a good understanding of the science and a multidisciplinary team of talented individuals to collaborate with, it makes executing the practical work all the more rewarding.

 

4. What is your favourite part of your day in work?

The end of the day -but not why you might think. I have been trying to be more reflective and as the start of the day can be very busy and hands on, I have found it helpful to review my workload and responsibilities, as well as that of those I help lead, at the end of the day; to better look ahead to tomorrow and acknowledge the efforts of the team.

 

5. What’s in your lab coat pocket?

Pens, markers, and more pens. My favourite being my engineering pen, with a torch and stylus included.  Thankfully we push for a more paperless world, but a busy lab can need some quick notes to be made. I’m also a very visual person and find it easiest to communicate to colleagues with notes or even a quick sketch.

 

6. In your opinion, what are the most important aspects of laboratory work?

The results we release. Fundamentally the data we release it for the benefit to the individual they deprived from. By stringently monitoring our quality checks and adhering to the procedures and processes we implement, we can have confidence that the results we release have a high level qualitative and interpretive value.

 

7. In what ways does your work make a difference to people’s lives?

At a personal level, as a clinical deputy manager I aim to optimise and evolve the duties of the colleagues I work with to make their jobs easier and more fulfilling and by extension the functionality of the lab more efficient.

In doing so, I broadly think the work we are doing as a collective, is bringing personalised testing to the masses and in doing so, add to improving the public’s understanding of science, in such that they can begin to take their health into their own hands in a measurable and meaningful way.

 

8. What is your dream career within biomedical science?

Living the dream. So far in my career I have been able to learn and develop within a profession that aligns with my interests, whilst simultaneously contributing to expanding and exciting industry. Throughout which I have had the opportunity to collaborate with many fantastic, talented, intelligent and hardworking people, from an array of disciplines, during the growth of a impressive clinical testing service as well as a nationwide covid testing service.

 

 

 

 

Jayme is a fundamental member of Randox and plays an essential role in the team, as do all our employees. Without our valuable laboratory team working extremely hard behind the scenes the lifesaving work we do here at Randox would not be possible. We thank each one of you for your hard work every day.

To find out more about our Biomedical Science, contact us at market@randox.com

 

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Randox sponsors Science Summer School Northern Ireland

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Monday 31st January 2022: Randox sponsors Science Summer School Northern Ireland

An official launch for Science Summer School Northern Ireland 2022 has taken place at the Ryobi headquarters in Carrickfergus.

Ryobi are the headline sponsor of the Science Summer School Northern Ireland event, which aims to inspire young people to become the next generation of scientists with an inspirational programme that mixes the best of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths) through a series of seminars, discussions and hands-on experiments.

On Friday, the Deputy Mayor of Mid and East Antrim, Lord Andrew Mawson OBE, Richard Mallett, and representatives from the other main sponsors, Terumo Blood and Cell Technologies, Randox, Almac, NRC and IPC Mouldings all gathered in Carrickfergus to officially launch the event which will take place later this year.

The Science Summer School initiative was established in 2012 at St. Paul’s Way Trust School in East London by Lord Andrew Mawson OBE and Professor Brian Cox CBE. The project is now expanding nationally with the aim to make ‘the UK the best place to do science and engineering in the world’.

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Matthew Armstrong, said:

 “Council’s Manufacturing Task Force are delighted to be working with a range of local businesses, schools, universities and partner organisations to bring this exciting opportunity to the borough.

“We are thrilled that this event is now going accessible to young people in Mid and East Antrim.

“Our hope is that they will be inspired to embark on a future in science and maybe even become leaders in that field.”

Managing Director of Ryobi, Marco Emig, said: 

 “Ryobi are delighted to be the headline sponsor of this event.

“Science and the desire to learn more about how our world works, and about how we can use that information to improve how we live our lives, has never been more attractive or relevant as a subject area and a potential career path.

“We are very much looking forward to seeing the creative ideas generated from our young people.”

Lord Mawson OBE said: 

 “The Science Summer School initiative here in Northern Ireland will activate the curiosities of the young people who take part and hopefully inspire them to great things.

“This annual celebratory event and the allied programme of STEAM related activity throughout the year provides a vital catalyst to bring together different partners from education and enterprise.  I am delighted to see so many companies have ‘signed up’ to support our first event this year.

 “There is never a better time to be bringing the Science School Northern Ireland hosted by Professor Cox to Ballymena.”

For further information please contact randoxpr@randox.com

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