Complement C3 Reagent

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Complement C3 Reagent

Reagent | Complement C3

Key Benefits of the Randox Complement C3 reagent

Exceptional correlation with standard methods

The Randox methodology was compared against other commercially available methods and the Randox Complement C3 assay showed a correlation coefficient of r=0.98

Wide measuring range

The healthy range for Complement C3 is 58 – 170 mg/dl.  The Randox Complement C3 assay can comfortably detect levels outside of the healthy range measuring between 13 – 502 mg/dl.

Excellent stability

Stable until expiry date when stored at +2 to +8°C

Other features of the Randox Complement C3 reagent

  • Immunoturbidimetric method
  • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
  • Stable until expiry date when stored at +2 to +8°C
  • Measuring range 13 – 502 mg/dl

Ordering information

Cat NoSize
CM3845R1 3 x 20ml (L)
R2 3 x 6ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
CM8023R1 2 x 11.2ml (L)
R2 2 x 4.2ml
EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
(L) Indicates liquid option

Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

What is the Complement C3 assay used for?

What is Complement C3?

The complement system is one of the major mechanisms of innate immunology consisting of more than 30 plasma and membrane-associated serum proteins which evokes cytolytic immune responses to pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, chemical tissue damage and anything that is classified as foreign to the body. The complement system can be activated through three major pathways: classical, lectin or alternative. Once activated, reactions occur for antibody opsonisation (the process by which a phagocyte marks a pathogen for ingestion and elimination) to fight against the foreign bodies.  Activation can also occur when the body produces antibodies for its own tissues that it views as being foreign, which is known as an autoimmune disorder. For more information on autoimmune disorders, please click here

During the activation process, Complement C3 splits down into C3b and C3a (peptide). C3b acts as an opsonin and remains bound to the complex at the surface of the pathogen which activates the next step of the process. The small peptide, C3a diffuses away and acts as a chemotactic factor and an inflammatory paracrine.

The Randox Complement C3 assay is used for the quantitative in vitro determination of complement C3 concentration in serum.  The Randox Complement C3 assay allows for the diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune disorders associated with abnormal levels of complement C3 including lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).  Higher than normal results may be indicative of cancer or ulcerative whereas lower than normal results may be indicative of lupus, hepatitis, or cirrhosis.

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    Specific Proteins Panel

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    Rheumatoid Factor

    Reagent | Rheumatoid Factor

    Rheumatoid Factor Key Benefits

    Exceptional correlation

    The Rheumatoid Factor assay showed a correlation of r=0.99 against another commercially available method

    Applications available

    For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers including the RX series

    Excellent stability

    Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8⁰C

    Superior Method

    Latex Enhanced Immunoturbidimetric method

    Ultimate convenience

    Liquid ready-to-use reagents

     Ordering information

    Cat NoSize
    RF3836R1 2 x 20ml (L)
    R2 2 x 8ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    RF8063R1 2 x 8.7ml (L)
    R2 2 x 4.7ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    RF8345R1 1 x 11.7ml (L)
    R2 1 x 5.7ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (L) Indicates liquid option

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    What is Rheumatoid Factor assay used for?

    Research has shown that both environmental and genetic factors can affect the production of RF with various biological properties. Although they may be found in all immunoglobulin classes, the RF most frequently detected is the IgM type; present in about 75% of adult patients with RA and about 10% of children with juvenile RA. RF have also been observed in the serum of patients with lupus erythematosus, hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, syphilis and various other conditions; but the RF titre is much lower than in RA.

    Specific Proteins Panel

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    Rapid Tests / Serology Panel

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    HbA1c

    Reagent | HbA1c

    HbA1c (Indirect)

    Key Benefits

    Latex Enhanced Immunoturbidimetric method

    The Randox assay utilises a latex enhanced immunoturbidimetric method for superior performance

    Exceptional correlation to standard methods

    A correlation coefficient of 0.98 was obtained with another commercially available method

    Excellent precision

    The HbA1c assay showed a precision of less than 5% CV

    Other Features

    • Latex enhanced immunoturbidimetric method
    • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
    • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8°C
    • Haemoglobin denaturant supplied with the kit
    Cat NoSize
    HA3830R1 3 x 14ml (L)
    R2 3 x 14ml
    R3 3 x 50ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    HA8321R1 4 x 7.8ml (L)
    R2 4 x 7.8ml
    R3 4 x 40ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (L) Indicates liquid option

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    HbA1c (Direct)

    • Latex enhanced immunoagglutination method
    • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
    • Stable to expiry when stored at +2 to +8°C
    • For use with RX series of clinical chemistry analysers
    Cat CodeSize
    HA8123R1 2 x 16.2ml (L)
    R2 2 x 8.2ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    HA8379R1 4 x 12.7ml (L)
    R2 4 x 6ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    HA4068R1 4 x 20ml (L)
    R2 4 x 8.6ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (L) Indicates liquid option

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    What is HbA1c assay used for?

    The concentration of HbA1c in the blood of diabetic patients increases with rising blood glucose levels and is representative of the mean blood glucose level over the preceding six to eight weeks. HbA1c can therefore be described as a long term indicator of diabetic control unlike blood glucose which is only a short term indicator of diabetic control.

    It is recommended that HbA1c levels are monitored every three to four months. In patients who have recently changed their therapy or in those who have gestational diabetes it may be beneficial to measure HbA1c levels more frequently, at two to four week intervals.

    Diabetes Panel

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    Specific Proteins Panel

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    Glucose

    Reagent | Glucose

    Key Benefits

    Exceptional correlation

    The Glucose assay showed a correlation of r=0.99 against another commercially available method

    Excellent stability

    Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8⁰C

    Flexibility

    Liquid and lyophilised reagents available for greater consumer choice

    Randox Glucose (GOD-PAP & Hexokinase)

    • GOD-PAP and Hexokinase method
    • Liquid and lypohilised reagents
    • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8°C

    Randox Glucose GOD-PAP

    Cat NoSize
    GL8038R1a 4 x 50ml (L)
    R1b 4 x 0.5ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    GL36410 x 100ml (S)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    GL26142 x 500ml (S) (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    GL38159 x 51ml (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    GL83184 x 20ml (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (L) Indicates liquid option
    (S) Indicates standard included in kit

    Randox Glucose Hexokinase

    Cat NoSize
    GL3816R1 4 x 51ml (L)
    R2 3 x 20ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    GL38814 x 50ml (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    GL8319R1 4 x 20ml (L)
    R2 4 x 6.5ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (L) Indicates liquid option

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    What is Glucose assay used for?

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the body. The body obtains glucose through the digestion of the sugar and starch in carbohydrates. Glucose is vital and interacts with the digestive and endocrine system. Due to this it is imperative to maintain glucose levels within the normal range.

    • Bor, M.V., et al. Serum fructosamine and fructosamine-albumin ratio as screening tests for gestational diabetes mellitus. Arch. Gynecol. Obstet. 1999, 262(3-4): 105-111
    • Ranganath, L., et al. The effect of circulating non-esterified fatty acids on the entero-insular axis. European Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1999, 29(1): 27-32
    • Joshi, S., et al. Fish oil supplementation of rats during pregnancy reduces adult disease in their offspring. J. Nutr., 2003, 133: 3170-3174
    • Sánchez-Rodríguez, M.A., et al. Antioxidant capacity in relationship to serum lipid peroxides levels in healthy elderly of Mexico City. 2004, 38(2): 193-198
    • Panagia, M., et al. PPAR-α activation required for decreased glucose uptake and increased susceptibility to injury during ischemia. Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol. 2005, 288: H2677-H2683
    • Chen, C-W and Cheng, H-H. A rice bran oil diet increases LDL-receptor and HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expressions and insulin sensitivity in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes. J. Nutr. 2006, 136: 1472-1476
    • Gupta, V. et al. Effect of short term cigarette smoking on insulin resistance and lipid profile in asymptomatic adults. Indian J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 2006, 50(3): 285-290
    • Lutoslawska, G., et al. Relationship between fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and plasma glycerol and free fatty acid levels in physically active males and females. Biol. Sport 2006, 23: 341-351
    • Miyashita, M., et al. Exercise and postpandrial lipemia: effect of continuous compared with intermittent activity patterns. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2006, 83(1): 24-29
    • Mula-Abed, W-A. S. and Aziz, S.B. Serum fructosamine (glycated protein) and related biochemical parameters during normal pregnancy. JBMS Journal of the Bahrain Medical Society 2006, 18(3): 115-122
    • Camarillo-Romero, M.S. et al. Riesgo cardiovascular en trabajadores universiatarios. (Article in Spanish). BioQCliNat. 2007,4(13): 9-15
    • Halley Castillo E., et al. Body Mass Index and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among children and adolescents in two Mexican populations. J. Adolesc. Health. 2007, 40(6): 521-526
    • James, A.P., et al. Prior exercise does not affect chylomicron particle number following a mixed meal of moderate fat content.Lipids Health Dis. 2007, 6: 8
    • Mineo, D., et al. Effects of lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema on glycolipidic hormones. Chest. 2008, 134(1): 30-37
    • Aziz, N., et al. Antihypertensive, antioxidant, antidyslipidemic and endothelial modulating activities of a polyherbal formulation (POL-10). Vascul. Pharmacol. 2009, 50(1-2): 57-64
    • Bajaj, S., et al. A case-control study on insulin resistance, metabolic co-variates and prediction score in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Indian J. Med. Res. 2009, 129: 285-292
    • Chou T-W., et al. A Rice bran oil diet improves lipid abnormalities and suppress hyperinsulinemic responses in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced Type 2 diabetes. J.Clin. Biochem.Nutr. 2009, 45(1): 29-36
    • García-Montalvo, E.A. et al. Fluoride exposure impairs glucose tolerance via decreased insulin expression and oxidative stress.Toxicology 2009, 263: 75-83
    • Hossein-nezhad, A., et al. Association of VDR gene polymorphism with insulin resistance in diabetic patients. Iranian Journal of Diabetes and Lipid Disorders. 2009, 143-150Kanakkaparambil, R., et al. B-vitamin and homocysteine status determines ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment in sheep. Biol. Reprod. 2009, 80(4): 743-752
    • Li, T-L. and Rush, B. The effects of prolonged strenuous exercise on salivary secretion of IgA subclasses in men. Int. J. Sport Exerc. Sci. 2009, 1(3): 69-752
    • Mirzaei, K., et al. Variation in the vistafin gene may alter the required dosage of oral antidiabetic agents in type 2 diabetic patients. Iranian Journal of Diabetes and Lipid Disorders 2009, 87-94
    • Režen, T., et al. Effect of CAR activation on selected metabolic pathways in normal and hyperlipidemic mouse livers. BMC Genomics. 2009, 10: 384
    • Rhodes, P., et al. Adult-onset obesity reveals prenatal programming of glucose-insulin sensitivity in male sheep nutrient restricted during late gestation. PloS ONE 2009, 4(10): e7393
    • Sébert, S.P., et al. Maternal nutrient restriction between early and midgestation and its impact upon appetite regulation after juvenile obesity. Endocrinology 2009, 150(2): 634-641
    • Usman K, M., et al. Correlation between non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and serum sialic acid. Annals 2009, 15(3): 152-154
    • Velasco-Martínez, R.M., et al. Obesity and insulin resistance among adolescents from Chiapas. Nutr. Hosp. 2009, 24(2)
    • Camarillo-Romero, E., et al. (Article in Spanish). Difficulties in the classification of metabolic syndrome. The example of adolescents in Mexico. Salud Publica Mex. 2010, 52(6): 524-527
    • Iffen, T.S. and Usoro C.A.O. The effect of ethanolic extract of Larpotea ovalifolia plants growing in Calabar on antioxidants status of streptozocin induced diabetic rats. Global Journal of Pharmacology 2010, 4(1): 01-05
    • Itam, E.H., et al. Haemapoietic and immunological changes in multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MDSTZ) rat models. European Journal of Scientific Research. 2010, 43(2): 283-289
    • Mahadik, S.R. et al. Role of adipocytokines in insulin resistance: Studies from Urban Western Indian Population. Int. J. Diabetes & Metab. 2010, 18(9): 35-42
    • Akpaso, M.I. et al. Effect of combined leaf extracts of Vernonia amygdalina (Bitter leaf) and Gongronema latifolium (Utazi) on the pancreatic β-cells of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. British Journal of Medicine and Medical Research. 2011, 1(1): 24-34
    • Chu, N.F et al. Prevalence and anthropometric risk of metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adolescents. ISRN Cardiol. 2011, 2011: 743640
    • Gupta, V., et al. Association of circulating resistin with metabolic risk factors in Indian females having metabolic syndrome.Toxicol. Int. 2011, 18(2): 168-172
    • Singal, S., et al. Is cardiovascular risk more in diabetics because of lower apolipoprotein A1 levels rather than higher Apo B/Apo A1 ratio? Int. J. Biomed. Res. 2011, 2(2): 143-150
    • Al-Rejaie, S.S., et al. Immobilization stress-induced oxidative damage and its amelioration with green and black teas. Afr. J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 2012, 6(8): 538-545
    • Belaïd-Nouira, Y., et al. Study of lipid profile and parieto-temporal lipid peroxidation in AICI3 mediated neurotoxicity. Modulatory effect of fenugreek seeds. Lipids Health Dis. 2012, 11: 16
    • Camarillo-Romero, E., et al. Effects of a physical activity program on markers of endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and metabolic status in adolescents with metabolic syndrome. ISRN Endocrinol. 2012, 2012: 970629
    • El-Abhar, H.S. and Schaalan, M.F. Topiramate-induced modulation of hepatic molecular mechanisms: an aspect for its anti-insulin resistant effect. PLoS ONE. 2012, 7(5): e37757
    • Gupta, V., et al. Association analysis of 31 common polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes and its related traaits in Indian sib pairs. Diabetologia. 2012, 55: 349-357)
    • Hammouda, O. et al. Effect of short-term maximal exercise on biochemical markers of muscle damage, total antioxidant status, and homocysteine levels in football players. AJSM. 2012, 3(4): 239-246
    • Hossein-nezhad, A. et al. Circulating omentin-1 in obesity and metabolic syndrome status compared to control subjects.Endocrinol. Metabol. Syndrome 2012: S1:008
    • Nagalakshmi, C.S. et al. Exploration of the clinico-biochemical parameters to explain the altered renal mechanisms in gestational diabetes mellitus. J. Clin. Diagn. Res. 2012, 6(3): 369-371
    • Odum, E.P. and Wakwe V.C. Plasma concentrations of water-soluble vitamins in metabolic syndrome subjects. Niger. J. Clin. Pract. 2012, 15: 442-447
    • Odum, E.P., et al. Antioxidant status of type 2 diabetic patients in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Niger J. Clin. Pract. 2012, 15: 55-58
    • Yahaya, N. et al. Type 2 diabetes with good glycemic control have improved insulin response and lower non-esterified fatty acid level after a meal challenge. Journal of Diabetes Mellitus 2012, 2(1): 1-7
    • Ikhlas, K.H., et al. The relation between serum total sialic acid and the presence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Iraqui J. Comm. Med. 2013, (1): 37-41
    • Kazeem, M.I., et al. Protective effect of free and bound polyphenol extracts from ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) on the hepatic antioxidant and some carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Evid. Based Complement. Alternat. Med. 2013: 935486
    • Wali, U., et al. Antioxidant status and lipid profile of diabetic rats treated with antioxidant rich locally prepared nutriceutical.IJDD. 2013, 1(2): 033-038
    • Yakubu, N., et al. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties of tofu (curdle soymilk) against acetaminophen-induced live damage rats. Biotech. Res. Int. 2013, ID 230142

    Diabetes Panel

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    Total Antioxidant Status (TAS) Assay

    Reagent | Total Antioxidant Status (TAS) 

    A Marker of Overall Antioxidant Status

    Benefits of the Randox TAS Assay

    Superior method

    The Randox TAS assay utilises the colorimetric method, offering convenience and efficiency in comparison to ELISA technology and produces results in as little as 3 minutes.

    Excellent measuring range

    The Randox TAS assay is linear up to 2.50mmol/l enabling the comfortable detection of clinically important results.

    Lyophilised reagents

    Lyophilised reagents offer enhanced stability, reducing wastage.

    Standard supplied with the kit

    The standard is supplied with the TAS kit, simplifying the ordering process.

    Dedicated TAS control available

    Dedicated TAS control available offering a complete testing package.

    Applications available

    Applications available detailing instrument-specific settings for the convenient use of the Randox TAS assay on a variety of clinical chemistry analsyers.

    Ordering information

    • Ordering Information
    Cat NoSize
    NX23325 x 10ml (S)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (S) Indicates standard included in kit

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    • PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE
    • Clinical Significance

    Free radicals / reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during normal cellular metabolism, however, can have harmful effects. Antioxidants are the first line of defence and are produced by the body to neutralise the harmful effects of ROS, preventing cellular damage 1,2, 3. Measuring total antioxidant status (TAS) can provide information on an individual’s overall antioxidant status, which may include antioxidants not yet recognised or not easily measured. The TAS of a sample is a quantitative measurement of the state of balance of the various components (exerting actions in different way) under specified reaction conditions 4.

    Reduced levels of total antioxidant status (TAS) is indicative of oxidative stress and increased susceptibility to oxidative damage 5. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between the ROS and antioxidants in the body, favouring ROS 6. Oxidative stress is associated with several health conditions, including: chronic inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, cancer and CVD 7.

    TAS Control

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    Glutathione Peroxidase (Ransel)

    Reagent | Glutathione Peroxidase (Ransel)

    A Marker of Oxidative Stress

    Key Benefits

    Superior Performance

    Superior method

    The Randox Ransel assay utilises the enzymatic method enabling the sensitive and accurate detection of glutathione peroxidase.

    Precision

    Excellent precision

    The Randox Ransel assay displayed a within run precision of <4.86% CV.

    Correlation

    Excellent correlation

    A correlation coefficient of r=0.9829 was displayed when the Randox Ransel assay was compared to commercially available methods.

    Calibrator & Controls

    Dedicated calibrator and control available

    Dedicated Ransel calibrator and control available offering a complete testing package.

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    Applications available

    Applications available detailing instrument-specific settings for the convenient use of the Randox Ransel assay on a variety of clinical chemistry analysers.

    Ordering Information

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    Diagnostic Uses

    • PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE
    • Clinical Significance

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is a reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by bodily cells via mitochondrial and enzymatic sources. It is vital that GPx levels are reviewed as it can cause oxidative damage to membrane lipids, proteins and DNA. GPx is an intracellular antioxidant enzyme that enzymatically converts hydrogen peroxide to water (detoxification). Hydrogen peroxidase is vital for the maintenance of normal thiol redox-balance, mitochondrial function, and growth factor-mediated signal transduction. By converting hydrogen peroxidase to water, GPx aids in modulating these processes 1. GPx also contributes to cell signalling and oxidative protein folding 2.

    Four of the eight glutathione peroxidases (GPx) are selenoproteins (containing the amino acid form of selenium, Sec) in humans, however, GPx6 is cysteine-containing in rodents, but a selenoprotein in humans, whereas the remaining GPx’s are cysteine containing. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) is emerging as one of the most important seleoproteins in mammals and is one of the key regulators of ferroptosis, a form of regulated necrotic cell death 2.

    GPx displays an inverse correlation with free radicals and consequently oxidative stress (OS). When GPx activity is reduced, antioxidant protection is impaired, resulting in oxidative damage to the membrane fatty acids and functional proteins, resulting in neurotoxic damage. Decreased GPx activity and OS is implicated in the incidence and progression of several health problems, including: cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders and other chronic conditions 3.

    Ransel Calibrator

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    Non-Esterified Fatty Acids (NEFA) Assay

    Reagent | Non-Esterified Fatty Acid (NEFA)

    Non-Esterified Fatty Acid (NEFA): A Marker of Insulin Resistance

    Benefits of the Randox NEFA Assay

    Exceptional correlation

    A correlation coefficient of r=0.98 was displayed when the Randox NEFA assay was compared to commercially available methods.

    Applications available

    Applications available detailing instrument-specific settings for the convenient use of the Randox NEFA assay on a variety of clinical chemistry analsyers.

    Extensive measuring range

    The Randox NEFA assay has a measuring range of 0.072 – 2.24mmol/l for the comfortable detection of clinically important results.

    Standard supplied with the kit

    The Randox NEFA kit includes the standard simplifying the ordering process.

    Controls available

    Controls available offering a complete testing package.

    Excellent precision

    The Randox NEFA assay displayed a precision of <5% CV.

    Ordering information

    • Ordering Information
    Cat NoSize
    FA115R1 3 x 10ml (C)
    R2 3 x 20ml
    EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (C) Indicates calibrator included in kit

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    • PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE
    • Clinical Significance

    Non-esterified fatty acids are important metabolites stored in adipose tissue. NEFA turnover is swift, with a plasma half – life of 2 to 4 minutes. The dominant source of NEFA is abdominal subcutaneous fat, with considerably less found in leg adipose tissue and a small proportion found in the intraabdominal adipose tissue. NEFA has been recognised as a vehicle by which triacylglycerol (TG) (stored in the adipose tissue) is transported to its sites of utilisation 1. NEFA has been identified as the major source for skeletal muscle during fasting stages and long periods between meals. Cross – sectional studies have consistently documented that circulating NEFA levels are proportional to body fat storage and demonstrated positive correlations between fasting NEFA levels and obesity, insulin resistance and glucose tolerance 2.

    Non-esterified fatty acids concentrations are strongly associated with insulin resistance. In the fasting state, the resistance of adipose tissue to the antilipolytic effect of insulin causes the extensive release of NEFA into circulation. Consequently, elevated NEFA levels exacerbate insulin resistance through diminishing insulin – stimulated glucose intake into the skeletal muscle, directly affecting insulin signalling 3.

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    Urinary Protein

    Reagent | Urinary Protein

    Key Benefits

    Applications available

    For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers including the RX series

    Strong correlation

    The Urinary Protein assay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.9998 against another commercially available method

    Standard included in kit

    Simplifying the ordering process

    Randox Urinary Protein (Colorimetric)

    • Colorimetric method
    • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
    • Stable to expiry date when stored at +15 to +25⁰C
    • Applications available
    Cat NoSize
    UP15703 x 100ml (S)(L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    UP81134 x 20ml (S)(L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
    (L) Indicates liquid option
    (S) Indicates standard included in kit

    Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

    What is Urinary Protein assay used for?

    Determination of Total Protein in urine and cerebrospinal fluid is valuable in the diagnosis of renal and central nervous system disorders respectively. Urinary protein elevations are commonly seen in the following conditions: strenuous exercise, fever and hypothermia, nephrosis and diabetic nephropathy and urinary tract infections. Determination of total protein in cerebrospinal fluid aids in the diagnosis of such conditions as meningitis, CNS tumours and cerebral haemorrhage.

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      Veterinary Panel

      For more information or to view more reagents within the veterinary panel, please click here


      Uric Acid

      Reagent | Uric Acid

      Key Benefits

      Applications available

      For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers including the RX series

      Strong correlation

      The Uric Acid assay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.99 against another commercially available method

      Excellent stability

      The Uric Acid assay has a precision of less than 4% CV

      Randox Uric Acid

      • Enzymatic Colorimetric method
      • Liquid and lyophilised reagents available
      • Stable to expiry date when stored unopened protected from light
      • Applications available
      Cat NoSize
      UA2306 x 15ml (S)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UA3824R1 6 x 51ml (L)
      R2 4 x 20ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UA38709 x 51ml (L)EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UA8069R1 6 x 56ml (L)
      R2 6 x 20ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UA8333R1 4 x 20ml (L)
      R2 4 x 7ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      (L) Indicates liquid option (S) Indicates standard included in kit

      Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

      What is Uric Acid assay used for?

      Uric acid measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of numerous renal and metabolic disorders including renal failure, gout, leukemia and psoriasis. Uric acid is a potent antioxidant contributing to around half the antioxidant capacity of blood plasma. It is a scavenging antioxidant that acts by inactivating free radicals such as HO and HOCI.

      Antioxidant Panel

      For more information or to view more reagents within the antioxidant panel, please click here

      Clinical Chemistry Panel

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      Urea

      Reagents | Urea

      Key Benefits

      Applications available

      For a wide variety of clinical chemistry analysers including the RX series

      Strong correlation

      The Urea assay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.9935 against another commercially available method

      Liquid and Lyophilised reagents available

      Randox Urea assays are available in liquid ready-to-use and lyophilised formats, offering greater consumer choice

       

      Randox Urea (Kinetic)

      • Kinetic method
      • Lyophilised reagents
      • Stable for 4 weeks at +2 to +9oC or 2 days at +15 to +25oC
      • Measuring range linear to 50mmol/l in serum or plasma, and 1050mmol/l in urine.
      • Applications available

       

       

      Cat NoSize
      UR446
      10 x 50ml (S)
      1 minute read
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      (L) Indicates liquid option (S) Indicates standard included in kit

      Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

      Randox Urea (Berthelot)

      • Berthelot method
      • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
      • Working reagent stable for 2 months at +2 to +8oC
      • Measuring range 1.59-40 mmol/l in serum and plasma
      • Applications available
      Cat NoSize
      UR1068170ml (S)
      Manual use only
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      (S) Indicates standard included in kit

      Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

      Randox Urea (Enzymatic Kinetic)

      • Enzymatic Kinetic method
      • Liquid ready-to-use reagents
      • Stable to expiry when stored at 2-8oC
      • Applications available
      Cat NoSize
      UR3825R1 6 x 51ml (L)
      R2 4 x 20ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UR9781R1 6 x 68ml
      R2 6 x 44ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UR8334R1 4 x 20ml
      R2 4 x 7ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      UR8070R1 6 x 56ml (L)
      R2 6 x 20ml
      EnquireKit Insert RequestMSDSBuy Online
      (L) Indicates liquid option

      Instrument Specific Applications (ISA’s) are available for a wide range of biochemistry analysers.  Contact us to enquire about your specific analyser.

      What is Urea assay used for?

      Urea is synthesized in the liver from ammonia, as a result of deamination of amino acids. This biosynthetic pathway is the chief means of excretion of surplus nitrogen by the body. Measurements obtained by this test are used in the diagnosis of renal and metabolic disorders, most frequently kidney disorders. More than 60% of the kidney must be destroyed before plasma urea levels are significantly raised. This test is most frequently used in conjunction with serum creatinine for increased protein levels (cardiac decompensation, water depletion).

      • Sánchez-Rodríguez, M.A., et al Antioxidant capacity in relationship to serum lipid peroxides levels in healthy elderly of Mexico City. 2004, 38(2): 193-198.
      • Wathes, D.C., et al Differences between primiparous and multiparous dairy cows in the inter-relationships between metabolic traits, milk yield and body condition score in the periparturient period. Domestic Animal Endocrinology. 2007, 33(2): 203-225.
      • Badiou. S., et al. Fine-tuning of the prediction of mortality in hemodialysis patients by use of cytokine proteomic determination.Clin. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. . 2006, 3: 423-430.
      • Rhodes, P., et al. Adult-onset obesity reveals prenatal programming of glucose-insulin sensitivity in male sheep nutrient restricted during late gestation. PloS ONE 2009, 4(10): e7393.

      Clinical Chemistry Panel

      For more information or to view more reagents within the clinical chemistry panel, please click here

      Veterinary Panel

      For more information or to view more reagents within the veterinary panel, please click here

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